Robinson Botero-Arias

Learn More
Little is known about the diversity, phylogenetic relationships, and biogeography of trypanosomes infecting non-mammalian hosts. In this study, we investigated the influence of host species and biogeography on shaping the genetic diversity, phylogenetic relationship, and distribution of trypanosomes from South American alligatorids and African crocodilids.(More)
Trypanosoma terena and Trypanosoma ralphi are known species of the South American crocodilians Caiman crocodilus, Caiman yacare and Melanosuchus niger and are phylogenetically related to the tsetse-transmitted Trypanosoma grayi of the African Crocodylus niloticus. These trypanosomes form the Crocodilian clade of the terrestrial clade of the genus(More)
The aim of the present study was to investigate the reproductive behavior of the giant Amazon River turtle (Podocnemis expansa) in the Amazon. This was carried out by estimating the degree of polymorphism in five DNA microsatellites in a sample of 359 hatchlings from 12 nests in the Mamirauá Sustainable Development Reserve in the municipality of Tefé, state(More)
Although nesting ecology is well studied in several crocodilian species, it is not known how nest attendance influences physiology and body condition of nesting females. In this study, we describe body condition and serum biochemical values of nesting female, non-nesting female and male spectacled caiman (Caiman crocodilus) and black caiman (Melanosuchus(More)
On the Amazon floodplain, the main predators of black caiman (Melanosuchus niger) eggs are jaguars (Panthera onca), tegu lizards (Tupinambis teguixim), capuchin monkeys (Sapajus macrocephalus) and humans (Homo sapiens). In this study, we investigated the relationship between predator attacks on nests and incubation period, and evaluated the influence of(More)
Background In some species, presence of multiple paternity, due to polyandric behavior have important consequences in the effective size of a population when compared to unique paternity, mainly when it is about endangered species[1]. Because the exacerbated exploitation of meat, guts and eggs as food by local communities, giant Amazonian river turtle(More)
Descriptions of new tool-use events are important for understanding how ecological context may drive the evolution of tool use among primate traditions. Here, we report a possible case of the first record of tool use by wild Amazonian capuchin monkeys (Sapajus macrocephalus). The record was made by a camera trap, while we were monitoring caiman nest(More)
  • 1