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Sensory hair cells and their associated non-sensory supporting cells in the inner ear are fundamental for hearing and balance. They arise from a common progenitor, but little is known about the molecular events specifying this cell lineage. We recently identified two allelic mouse mutants, light coat and circling (Lcc) and yellow submarine (Ysb), that show(More)
In the mouse, Sry is expressed by germ cells in the adult testis and by somatic cells in the genital ridge. Transcripts in the former exist as circular RNA molecules of 1.23 kb, which are unlikely to be efficiently translated. We have used RNase protection to map the extent of the less abundant Sry transcript in the developing gonad. We demonstrate that it(More)
Sox2 is one of the earliest known transcription factors expressed in the developing neural tube. Although it is expressed throughout the early neuroepithelium, we show that its later expression must depend on the activity of more than one regionally restricted enhancer element. Thus, by using transgenic assays and by homologous recombination-mediated(More)
In vertebrates, the delineation of the neural plate from a region of the primitive ectoderm is accompanied by the onset of specific gene expression which in turn promotes the formation of the nervous system. Here we show that SOX1, an HMG-box protein related to SRY, is one of the earliest transcription factors to be expressed in ectodermal cells committed(More)
The mammalian Y chromosome acts as a dominant male determinant as a result of the action of a single gene, Sry, whose role in sex determination is to initiate testis rather than ovary development from early bipotential gonads. It does so by triggering the differentiation of Sertoli cells from supporting cell precursors, which would otherwise give follicle(More)
The initiation of male development in mammals requires one or more genes on the Y chromosome. A recently isolated gene, termed SRY in humans and Sry in mouse, has many of the genetic and biological properties expected of a Y-located testis-determining gene. It is now shown that Sry on a 14-kilobase genomic DNA fragment is sufficient to induce testis(More)
Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are non-transformed cell lines derived directly from the pluripotent founder tissue in the mouse embryo, the epiblast [1-3]. Aggregation of ES cells triggers the generation of a diverse array of cell types, including neuronal cells [4-7]. This capacity for multilineage differentiation is retained during genetic manipulation(More)
The response to neural induction depends on the presence of inducing signals and on the state of competence of the responding tissue. The epiblast of the chick embryo loses its ability to respond to neural induction by the organizer (Hensen's node) between stages 4 and 4+. We find that the pattern of expression of the L5(220) antigen closely mirrors the(More)
DAX1, which encodes an unusual member of the nuclear hormone-receptor superfamily, is a gene that may be responsible for a sex-reversal syndrome in humans, referred to as dosage-sensitive sex reversal, in which XY individuals carrying duplications of Xp21, part of the small arm of the X chromosome, develop as females. XY mice carrying extra copies of mouse(More)
The pituitary develops from the interaction of the infundibulum, a region of the ventral diencephalon, and Rathke's pouch, a derivative of oral ectoderm. Postnatally, its secretory functions are controlled by hypothalamic neurons, which also derive from the ventral diencephalon. In humans, mutations affecting the X-linked transcription factor SOX3 are(More)