Robert V. Tauxe

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Estimates of foodborne illness can be used to direct food safety policy and interventions. We used data from active and passive surveillance and other sources to estimate that each year 31 major pathogens acquired in the United States caused 9.4 million episodes of foodborne illness (90% credible interval [CrI] 6.6-12.7 million), 55,961 hospitalizations(More)
To describe the epidemiology of appendicitis and appendectomy in the United States, the authors analyzed National Hospital Discharge Survey data for the years 1979-1984. Approximately 250,000 cases of appendicitis occurred annually in the United States during this period, accounting for an estimated 1 million hospital days per year. The highest incidence of(More)
To determine the burden of Salmonella infections in the United States, Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) investigators conducted population-based active surveillance for culture-confirmed Salmonella infections during 1996-1999 at FoodNet laboratories. In addition, all clinical microbiology FoodNet laboratories were surveyed to(More)
PulseNet, the national molecular subtyping network for foodborne disease surveillance, was established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and several state health department laboratories to facilitate subtyping bacterial foodborne pathogens for epidemiologic purposes. PulseNet, which began in 1996 with 10 laboratories typing a single pathogen(More)
Each year, 31 major known pathogens acquired in the United States caused an estimated 9.4 million episodes of foodborne illness. Additional episodes of illness were caused by unspecified agents, including known agents with insufficient data to estimate agent-specific illness, known agents not yet recognized as causing foodborne illness, substances known to(More)
Richard L. Guerrant, Thomas Van Gilder, Ted S. Steiner, Nathan M. Thielman, Laurence Slutsker, Robert V. Tauxe, Thomas Hennessy, Patricia M. Griffin, Herbert DuPont, R. Bradley Sack, Phillip Tarr, Marguerite Neill, Irving Nachamkin, L. Barth Reller, Michael T. Osterholm, Michael L. Bennish, and Larry K. Pickering University of Virginia, Charlottesville;(More)
Fresh produce is an important part of a healthy diet. During the last three decades, the number of outbreaks caused by foodborne pathogens associated with fresh produce consumption reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has increased. To identify trends, we analyzed data for 1973 through 1997 from the Foodborne Outbreak Surveillance(More)
Address for correspondence: Paul S. Mead, Division of Bacterial and Mycotic Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Mail Stop A38, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA; fax: 404-639-2205; e-mail: pfm0@cdc.gov. More than 200 known diseases are transmitted through food (1). The causes of foodborne illness include viruses, bacteria,(More)
Campylobacter is a common cause of gastroenteritis in the United States. We conducted a population-based case-control study to determine risk factors for sporadic Campylobacter infection. During a 12-month study, we enrolled 1316 patients with culture-confirmed Campylobacter infections from 7 states, collecting demographic, clinical, and exposure data using(More)