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In the words of the authors, the goal of this book was to " bring together many of the important new ideas in learning, and explain them in a statistical framework. " The authors have been quite successful in achieving this objective and their work will be a welcome addition to the statistics and learning literatures. Statistics has always been an(More)
With the increase in genomewide experiments and the sequencing of multiple genomes, the analysis of large data sets has become commonplace in biology. It is often the case that thousands of features in a genomewide data set are tested against some null hypothesis, where a number of features are expected to be significant. Here we propose an approach to(More)
Boosting (Freund & Schapire 1996, Schapire & Singer 1998) is one of the most important recent developments in classiication methodology. The performance of many classiication algorithms can often be dramatically improved by sequentially applying them to reweighted versions of the input data, and taking a weighted majority vote of the sequence of classiiers(More)
We consider the problem of estimating sparse graphs by a lasso penalty applied to the inverse covariance matrix. Using a coordinate descent procedure for the lasso, we develop a simple algorithm--the graphical lasso--that is remarkably fast: It solves a 1000-node problem ( approximately 500,000 parameters) in at most a minute and is 30-4000 times faster(More)
The purpose of this study was to classify breast carcinomas based on variations in gene expression patterns derived from cDNA microarrays and to correlate tumor characteristics to clinical outcome. A total of 85 cDNA microarray experiments representing 78 cancers, three fibroadenomas, and four normal breast tissues were analyzed by hierarchical clustering.(More)
Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common subtype of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, is clinically heterogeneous: 40% of patients respond well to current therapy and have prolonged survival, whereas the remainder succumb to the disease. We proposed that this variability in natural history reflects unrecognized molecular heterogeneity in the tumours.(More)
We have devised an approach to cancer class prediction from gene expression profiling, based on an enhancement of the simple nearest prototype (centroid) classifier. We shrink the prototypes and hence obtain a classifier that is often more accurate than competing methods. Our method of "nearest shrunken centroids" identifies subsets of genes that best(More)