Robert T M Forbes

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An investigation of the influence of dietary zinc (8, 35, 200 ppm) on the toxicity of dietary lead (0, 50, 200 ppm) in the young male rat in a seven week period indicated that as dietary zinc increased, the severity of lead toxicity decreased. Evidence included decreased lead concentration in blood, liver, kidneys, and tibias; decreased excretion of urinary(More)
An investigation of the influence of dietary copper (1, 5, 20 ppm) on toxicity of dietary lead (0 and 200 ppm) in the young male rat in a 4-week period indicated that as dietary copper increase so did the severity of lead toxicity. Evidence included increased lead concentration in kidney and a two- to threefold increase in the excretion of urinary(More)
A series of six experiments was conducted to investigate the effects of Mg deficiency in the young rat on parathyroid hormone (PTH) activity and on response to parathyroid extract (PTE) and to endogenously produced PTH stimulated by dietary Ca deficiency. Major criteria employed were 45Ca release from pre-labeled bone and urinary excretion of cAMP. Mg(More)
An investigation of the influence of dietary selenium (0.015, 0.05, 0.50, 1.0 ppm) on toxicity of dietary lead (0 and 200 ppm) in the young male rat indicated that selenium was mildly protective against the toxic effects of lead, but only up to 0.50 ppm selenium. At the excess selenium dietary level an exaggeration of lead toxicity was observed. Criteria(More)
A series of five experiments was conducted with young male albino rats to investigate effects of various levels of dietary Ca, P and Mg on urinary cAMP excretion and kidney calcification. Urinary cAMP excretion was shown to be directly correlated with injected parathyroid (PT) hormone dose level and to be inversely associated with dietary Ca intake. Thus,(More)