Robert S. Daum

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Staphylococcus aureus is an important cause of skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs), endovascular infections, pneumonia, septic arthritis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, foreign-body infections, and sepsis. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates were once confined largely to hospitals, other health care environments, and patients frequenting these(More)
Evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for adult and pediatric patients with MRSA infections. The guidelines discuss(More)
Evidence-based guidelines for the management of patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections were prepared by an Expert Panel of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA). The guidelines are intended for use by health care providers who care for adult and pediatric patients with MRSA infections. The guidelines discuss(More)
CONTEXT Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in children have occurred primarily in individuals with recognized predisposing risks. Community-acquired MRSA infections in the absence of identified risk factors have been reported infrequently. OBJECTIVES To determine whether community-acquired MRSA infections in(More)
We identified a new type of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) from two community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. The novel element, designated type IV SCCmec, had a unique combination of the class B mec gene complex and the type 2 ccr gene complex and was much smaller in size (21 to 24 kb) than previously(More)
Community-acquired (CA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection among individuals without healthcare-associated (HA) risk factors was first recognized about a decade ago. It has now emerged as an epidemic that is responsible for rapidly progressive, fatal diseases including necrotizing pneumonia, severe sepsis and necrotizing fasciitis.(More)
BACKGROUND A community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infection has been defined as an MRSA infection in a patient who lacks specific risk factors for healthcare exposure. We sought to determine whether the absence or presence of these risk factors still predicts the phenotypic or genotypic characteristics of MRSA strains.(More)
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates carry the methicillin resistance gene (mecA) on a horizontally transferred genetic element called the staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec). Community-acquired MRSA (CAMRSA) isolates usually carry SCCmec type IV. We previously reported that 76% of 17 CAMRSA isolates (multilocus sequence(More)
We investigated the genetic relatedness of 5 community-acquired (CA) Staphylococcus aureus isolates obtained from 4 consecutive pediatric patients presenting with sepsis syndrome and severe pneumonia during a 3-week period in 2000. Two patients were infected with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), and 2 were infected with methicillin-resistant S.(More)
BACKGROUND The prevalence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections increased at the University of Chicago Children's Hospital (UCCH) from 10 per 100,000 admissions from 1988 to 1990 to 259 per 100,000 admissions from 1993 to 1995. Because this increase may have represented a one time occurrence or a limited disease(More)