Robert M. Steinman

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1. The binocular co-ordination of human horizontal saccades was analysed for the first time systematically over the full oculomotor range with a precise and accurate scleral sensor coil technique. Effects of amplitude (1.25-80 deg), direction (adduction vs. abduction and centrifugal vs. centripetal) and eccentricity (symmetrical about primary or between(More)
1. The binocular co-ordination of human vertical saccades was analysed systematically over the full oculomotor range, with a precise and accurate scleral sensor coil technique. Effects of amplitude (1.25-70 deg), direction (upward vs. downward and centripetal vs. centrifugal), as well as position (upper or lower sector of vertical oculomotor range), were(More)
Horizontal binocular eye movements of three subjects were recorded with the scleral sensor coil--revolving magnetic field technique during voluntary shifts of gaze between pairs of stationary, real, continuously visible targets. The target pairs were located either along the median plane (requiring symmetrical vergence), or on either side of the median(More)
UNLABELLED Eye and head movements were recorded as unrestrained subjects tapped or only looked at nearby targets. Scanning patterns were the same in both tasks: subjects looked at each target before tapping it; visual search had similar speeds and gaze-shift accuracies. Looking, however, took longer and, unlike tapping, benefitted little from practice.(More)
Gaze-shift dynamics of unrestrained seated subjects were examined. The subjects participated in two tasks. In the first task, they tapped sequences of 3-D targets located on a table in front of them. In the second task, they only looked at similar sequences of targets. The purpose of the task (tapping vs only looking) affected the dynamics of gaze-shifts.(More)
Eye movements associated with eyelid closure were recorded in human subjects with search coils, embedded in self-adhering scleral annuli, in a magnetic field. In contrast to classical notions, voluntary as well as reflex blinks were consistently accompanied by transient downward and nasalward movements of both eyes with amplitudes 1-5 degrees. These eye(More)
We studied the dynamics of voluntary, horizontal, binocular gaze-shifts between pairs of continuously visible, real three-dimensional targets. Subjects were stabilized on a biteboard to allow full control of target angles, which were made to differ only in distance (pure vergence), only in direction (pure version; conjugate saccades) or in both distance and(More)
Horizontal binocular eye movements of four subjects were recorded with the scleral sensor coil--revolving magnetic field technique while they fixated a natural target, whose distance was varied in a normally illuminated room. The distance of the target relative to the head of the subject was changed in three ways: (a) the target was moved manually by the(More)