Robert M Brackbill

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OBJECTIVE This study compared the prevalence and risk factors of current probable posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) across different occupations involved in rescue/recovery work at the World Trade Center site. METHOD Rescue and recovery workers enrolled in the World Trade Center Health Registry who reported working at the World Trade Center site(More)
CONTEXT The World Trade Center Health Registry provides a unique opportunity to examine long-term health effects of a large-scale disaster. OBJECTIVE To examine risk factors for new asthma diagnoses and event-related posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms among exposed adults 5 to 6 years following exposure to the September 11, 2001, World Trade Center (WTC)(More)
BACKGROUND Studies have consistently documented declines in respiratory health after 11 September 2001 (9/11) among surviving first responders and other World Trade Center (WTC) rescue, recovery, and clean-up workers. OBJECTIVES The goal of this study was to describe the risk of newly diagnosed asthma among WTC site workers and volunteers and to(More)
In public health research and practice, quality of life is increasingly acknowledged as a valid and appropriate indicator of service need and intervention outcomes. Health-related quality of life measures, including objective and subjective assessments of health, are particularly useful for evaluating efforts in the prevention of disabling chronic diseases.(More)
To date, health effects of exposure to the September 11, 2001 disaster in New York City have been studied in specific groups, but no studies have estimated its impact across the different exposed populations. This report provides an overview of the World Trade Center Health Registry (WTCHR) enrollees, their exposures, and their respiratory and mental health(More)
Although the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks were the largest human-made disaster in US history, there is little extant research documenting the attacks' consequences among those most directly affected, that is, persons who were in the World Trade Center towers. Data from a cross-sectional survey conducted 2-3 years after the attacks ascertained the(More)
Manhattan residents living near the World Trade Center may have been particularly vulnerable to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after the September 11, 2001 (9/11) terrorist attacks. In 2003-2004, the authors administered the PTSD Checklist to 11,037 adults who lived south of Canal Street in New York City on 9/11. The prevalence of probable PTSD was(More)
BACKGROUND Co-occurrence of lower respiratory symptoms (LRS) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been increasingly recognized among responders and survivors of the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster. Information is limited on the degree which comorbidity intensifies symptoms and compromises quality of life across exposed groups. METHODS Among(More)
BACKGROUND Although adolescent use of condoms has been increasing, incidence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among young people remains high. To identify adolescent behavioral risk factors for acquiring STDs, this study assessed adolescent self-reports of acquired chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, and trichomoniasis within 1 year after a baseline(More)
OBJECTIVE To determine trends in cigarette smoking prevalence among physicians, registered nurses, and licensed practical nurses since 1974. DESIGN Analyses of data on smoking prevalence among persons 20 years of age and older using combined National Health Interview Survey data sets from 1974, 1976, and 1977; 1978, 1979, and 1980; 1983 and 1985; 1987 and(More)