Robert J. Mislevy

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As observations and student models become complex, educational assessments that exploit advances in technology and cognitive psychol­ ogy can outstrip familiar testing models and ana­ lytic methods. Within the Portal conceptual framework for assessment design, Bayesian inference networks (BINs) record beliefs about students' knowledge and skills, in light(More)
As observations and student models become complex, educational assessments that exploit advances in technology and cognitive psychology can outstrip familiar testing models and analytic methods. Within the Portal conceptual framework for assessment design, Bayesian inference networks (BINs) record beliefs about stu-dents' knowledge and skills, in light of(More)
In this paper we illustrate a simple scheme for dividing a complex Bayes network into a system model and a collection of smaller evidence models. While the system model maintains a permanent record of the state of the system of interest, the evidence models are only used momentarily to absorb evidence from specific observations or findings and then(More)
The application of Bayesian networks (BNs) to cognitive assessment and intelligent tutoring systems poses new challenges for model construction. When cognitive task analyses suggest constructing a BN with several latent variables, empirical model criticism of the latent structure becomes both critical and complex. This paper introduces a methodology for(More)
Packet Tracer is a comprehensive instructional software application for teaching skills and concepts associated with computer networking. In addition to a wide range of simulation, visualization, and micro-world authoring features to support student-centered Exploration, Explanation and Experimentation, Packet Tracer includes features for assessment task(More)
We used a Guttman model to represent responses to test items over time as an approximation of what is often referred to as "points lost" in studies of cognitive decline or interventions. To capture this meaning of "point loss", over four successive assessments, we assumed that once an item is incorrect, it cannot be correct at a later visit. If the loss of(More)
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