Robert J. Cooper

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Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) allows the recovery of cortical oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin changes associated with evoked brain activity. NIRS is a back-reflection measurement making it very sensitive to the superficial layers of the head, i.e. the skin and the skull, where systemic interference occurs. As a result, the NIRS signal is strongly contaminated(More)
Motion artifacts are a significant source of noise in many functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) experiments. Despite this, there is no well-established method for their removal. Instead, functional trials of fNIRS data containing a motion artifact are often rejected completely. However, in most experimental circumstances the number of trials is(More)
Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) measures the functional hemodynamic response occurring at the surface of the cortex. Large pial veins are located above the surface of the cerebral cortex. Following activation, these veins exhibit oxygenation changes but their volume likely stays constant. The back-reflection geometry of the NIRS measurement renders the(More)
Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is susceptible to signal artifacts caused by relative motion between NIRS optical fibers and the scalp. These artifacts can be very damaging to the utility of functional NIRS, particularly in challenging subject groups where motion can be unavoidable. A number of approaches to the removal of motion artifacts from NIRS data(More)
We describe the validation of an anatomical brain atlas approach to the analysis of diffuse optical tomography (DOT). Using MRI data from 32 subjects, we compare the diffuse optical images of simulated cortical activation reconstructed using a registered atlas with those obtained using a subject's true anatomy. The error in localization of the simulated(More)
In recent years, it has been demonstrated that using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) channels with short separations to explicitly sample extra-cerebral tissues can provide a significant improvement in the accuracy and reliability of fNIRS measurements. The aim of these short-separation channels is to measure the same superficial hemodynamics(More)
PCR has revolutionized the field of infectious disease diagnosis. To overcome the inherent disadvantage of cost and to improve the diagnostic capacity of the test, multiplex PCR, a variant of the test in which more than one target sequence is amplified using more than one pair of primers, has been developed. Multiplex PCRs to detect viral, bacterial, and/or(More)
Data relating to 3313 adenovirus isolates from patients in Greater Manchester, UK between 1982 and 1996 were analysed using chi2 tests and 95% confidence intervals. Of the 3098 isolates that were typed, 18.6% were serotype 2, 14.9% serotype 3, 12.1% serotype 1 and 10.9% serotype 41. There was evidence of a seasonal occurrence of serotype 7 (March-August),(More)
It has been established, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) is present in a high proportion of brains of elderly normal subjects and Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. It was subsequently discovered that the virus confers a strong risk of AD when in brain of carriers of the type 4 allele of the apolipoprotein E(More)
Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) allows the recovery of the evoked hemodynamic response to brain activation. In adult human populations, the NIRS signal is strongly contaminated by systemic interference occurring in the superficial layers of the head. An approach to overcome this difficulty is to use additional NIRS measurements with short optode(More)