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Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neurotrophic and neuroprotective peptide that has been shown to exert protective effects against different neuronal injuries, such as traumatic brain and spinal cord injury, models of neurodegenerative diseases, and cerebral ischemia. PACAP and its receptors are present in the retina. In this(More)
In the rabbit retina, parvalbumin has been localized selectively to AII amacrine cells, while 28 kDa calbindin could be detected in horizontal cells, in one type of depolarizing cone bipolar cell and a population of wide-field amacrine cells. The distribution of the third neuronal calcium binding protein, calretinin, however, has not been studied to date in(More)
We investigated the cellular localization in the salamander retina of one of the somatostatin [or somatotropin release-inhibiting factor (SRIF)] receptors, sst(2A), and studied the modulatory action of SRIF on voltage-gated K(+) and Ca(2+) currents in rod and cone photoreceptors. SRIF immunostaining was observed in widely spaced amacrine cells, whose(More)
Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neuropeptide with highly potent neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects. PACAP and its receptors occur in the retina and PACAP has been applied in animal models of metabolic retinal disorders to reduce structural and functional damage. Furthermore, PACAP has been implicated as a potential(More)
PURPOSE The ubiquitous pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) has a disparate array of functions in development (e.g., proliferation and apoptosis). Among three types of PACAP receptor (VPAC1, VPAC2, and PAC1), PAC1 is subject to alternative splicing that generates isoforms. Although the literature documenting the presence of PACAP receptors(More)
Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neurotrophic and neuroprotective peptide that has been shown to exert protective effects in different neuronal injuries, such as traumatic brain injury, models of neurodegenerative diseases and cerebral ischemia. We have provided evidence that PACAP is neuroprotective in several models of(More)
Diazoxide (DIAZ) has been shown to be neuroprotective in animal models of different brain pathologies. However, the direct protective effect of DIAZ in different in vivo models of retinal degeneration has not yet been shown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the neuroprotective role of this compound in two rodent model systems:(More)
Gap junctions connect cells in the bodies of all multicellular organisms, forming either homologous or heterologous (i.e. established between identical or different cell types, respectively) cell-to-cell contacts by utilizing identical (homotypic) or different (heterotypic) connexin protein subunits. Gap junctions in the nervous system serve electrical(More)
Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating popypeptide (PACAP) is a pleiotropic neuropeptide, exerting neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects in numerous models of in vitro and in vivo nervous injuries. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether PACAP is neuroprotective in ischemic retinal damage. Adult male Wistar rats underwent bilateral(More)
Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is known for its potent neuroprotective effects, including the retinoprotective actions in several types of retinal injuries. We have shown earlier that PACAP treatment causes activation of protective pathways and inhibition of pro-apoptotic signaling in excitotoxic retinal lesions. The aim of the(More)