Robert Fritz

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Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative pathogen causing life-threatening infections. Lung injury and the development of sepsis depend largely on the expression of type III secretion system (TTSS) virulence. TTSS functions as a molecular syringe to deliver toxins directly to the cytosol of cells, inhibit innate immune mechanisms, and prevent bacterial(More)
The human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related gene A (MICA), located 46 kb centromeric to HLA-B, encodes a stress-inducible protein, which is a ligand for the NKG2D receptor. In addition to its primary role in immune surveillance, data suggest that MICA is involved in the immune response to transplants and in susceptibility to some(More)
The mucin layer of the bladder covering the transitional epithelium is thought to be an anti-adherence substance for bacteria. We have previously demonstrated that removal of this layer results in increased bacterial colonization. In this present communication we report our attempts to isolate and characterize the components of the mucin layer. Bladders(More)
Previous studies performed in our laboratory indicated that the primary antibacterial defense mechanism of the rabbit bladder is the antiadsorptive action of the surface mucopolysaccharide. The increased bacterial adsorption that occurs when the bladder is denuded of this layer was prevented by the instillation of heparin. Additional studies showed that the(More)
One of the primary antibacterial defense mechanisms of the bladder is the action of the luminal mucopolysaccharide layer against adsorption of inoculated bacteria. Previous studies have shown that local instillation of the mucopolysaccharide heparin can prevent bacterial adsorption on the bladder mucosa denuded of this "antiadherence factor". To determine(More)
The mucopolysaccharide (MPS) layer of the bladder has been implicated as a bacterial anti-adherence factor in previous experimentation. Production of MPS is known to be related to hormones in other systems of the body and probably to the urinary system. Due to the known rising incidence of urinary tract infection in most menopausal females, an experimental(More)
One of the primary antibacterial defense mechanisms of the bladder is the action of the luminal mucopolysaccharide layer against adsorption of inoculated bacteria. Previous studies have shown that local instillation of the mucopolysaccharide heparin can prevent bacterial adsorption on the bladder mucosa denuded of this "antiadherence factor." To determine(More)
Hormonal manipulation has been shown to result in less efficient bladder clearance of bacteria. We describe the use of a double antibody technique to semiquantitatively demonstrate the diminution of bladder glycoproteins from the transitional epithelium in oophorectomized rabbits. Rabbit bladder glycoprotein was isolated and used to immunize Swiss-Webster(More)