Robert Daley

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A v ery common metaphor used when discussing the World Wide Web, and hypertextual systems in general , is that of navigation within a space. An alternative metaphor is to view a session with any such system as a dialogue or conversation. This potentially richer metaphor acknowledges the interactive nature of the experience, and may open up new ways of(More)
This paper considers the performance of Digital Subscriber Lines (DSL) in the presence of impulse noise in terms of data errors. Impulse noise is one of the biggest impairments for xDSL systems. An analysis of error statistics of transmitted data for two popular versions of xDSL - ADSL and SHDSL - is reported here. On the basis of a recent novel impulse(More)
  • Robert Daley, Stephen J Greeny, Maria Milosavljevicz, Sandra Williamsy
  • 2005
Research in natural language generation promises signiicant advances in the ways in which we can make available the contents of underlying information sources. Most work in the eld relies on the existence of carefully constructed artiicial intelligence knowledge bases; however, the reality is that most information currently stored on computers is not(More)
  • Andrea Aldrich, Daniel Berkowitz, Christopher Bonneau, Julia Bursten, Stephen Carr, Robert Daley +12 others
  • 2011
1. Acting Associate Dean Stephen L. Carr welcomed new and continuing members. 2. Dean Carr presented the mission and charge of the Arts and Sciences Graduate Council. Dean Carr read the responsibilities listed in the A&S Gazette and the A&S Grad-Guide. Also a review of the types of proposals and items the Council has considered in the past were enumerated.(More)
In recent years DSL has become the dominant network access technology, at the same time many countries are unbundling their access networks. This unbundling represents a risk for DSL deployment in that control and management of the services deployed becomes more problematical. Crosstalk is the most important source of noise/interference on the line.(More)
A very common metaphor used when discussing the World Wide Web, and hypertextual systems in general , is that of navigation within a space. This is not the only way to think about hypertext, however: an alternative , and potentially richer, metaphor is to view a session with any such system as a dialogue, with the user and the system taking alternate turns(More)