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Home range size and habitat use of seropositive Oryzomys palustris, primary host for the Bayou strain of hantavirus, were compared to that of seronegative individuals from March 2002-August 2003 in a longitudinal field population study. There were significant macrohabitat associations with serological status, but selection for most microhabitat variables(More)
Hybridization between distantly related organisms can facilitate rapid adaptation to novel environments, but is potentially constrained by epistatic fitness interactions among cell components. The zoonotic pathogens Campylobacter coli and C. jejuni differ from each other by around 15% at the nucleotide level, corresponding to an average of nearly 40 amino(More)
What is currently known about the ecology of North American hantaviruses has come largely from studies on Sin Nombre virus (SNV). We conducted a longitudinal study of Bayou virus (BAYV), the second-leading agent of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in the United States. Antibodies to hantavirus were detected from Oryzomys palustris (most commonly infected(More)
To explore geographic and host-taxonomic patterns of hantaviruses in Paraguay, we established sampling sites in the Mbaracayú Biosphere Reserve. We detected Jaborá virus and Itapúa37/Juquitiba–related virus in locations ≈20 m apart in different years, which suggested sympatry of 2 distinct hantaviruses. H antaviruses are rodent-borne viruses that may cause(More)
BACKGROUND Longitudinal mark-recapture studies of rodents in two sites in the Mbaracayú Biosphere Reserve in the Interior Atlantic Forest of eastern Paraguay have revealed a complex and intriguing pattern of hantaviruses harbored by rodents in this area. Full-length sequencing and phylogenetic analyses were conducted for several rodents from Akodon(More)
To explore geographic and host-taxonomic patterns of hantaviruses in Paraguay, we established sampling sites in the Mbaracayu Biosphere Reserve. We detected Jabora virus and Itapua37/Juquitiba-related virus in locations approximately 20 m apart in different years, which suggested sympatry of 2 distinct hantaviruses.
The Northern Pygmy Mouse (Baiomys taylori) occurs throughout much of Mexico and into the southwestern United States, with its range currently expanding northward in the U.S. Despite documentation of species range expansion, there have been very few studies that have monitored population growth patterns in this species. During a 16-month mark-recapture study(More)
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