Robert Carter McRee

Learn More
A large increase in the number and percentage of degranulating mast cells was observed within thalamus of rats after 6-7 days of thiamine deficiency (TD). No mast cells were detected in the inferior olivary and lateral vestibular nuclei, which are also severely damaged by TD. After 11-12 days of TD, the number of ED2 immunopositive macrophages increased in(More)
Breakdown of the blood brain barrier and the subsequent accumulation of free radicals, lactate, and glutamate appear to be the immediate causes of thiamine deficiency (TD)-induced damage to thalamus. The mechanisms triggering these events are unknown but recent evidence suggests an important role of histamine. We therefore studied the effects of histamine(More)
The current study examined the possible role of increased histamine release and granulocyte activity in the vascular changes that precede the onset of necrotic lesions with the thalamus of the pyrithiamine-induced thiamine deficiency (PTD) rat model of Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE). An increase in histamine release and the number of granulocytes was(More)
Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves selective loss of muscarinic m2, but not m1, subtype receptors in cortical and hippocampal regions of the human brain. Emission tomographic study of the loss of m2 receptors in AD has been limited by the absence of available m2-selective radioligands, which can penetrate the blood-brain barrier. We now report on the in(More)
Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves selective loss of muscarinic m2, but not m1, subtype neuroreceptors in cortical and hippocampal regions of the human brain. Emission tomographic study of the loss of m2 receptors in AD is limited by the fact that there is currently no available m2-selective radioligand which can penetrate the blood-brain barrier. We now(More)
Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves selective loss of muscarinic m2, but not m1, subtype neuroreceptors in cortical and hippocampal regions of the human brain. Emission tomographic study of the loss of m2 receptors in AD is limited by the fact that there is currently no available m2-selective radioligand which can penetrate the blood-brain barrier. We have(More)
The effect of GABA in controlling luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) release from isolated hypothalamic fragments containing the mediobasal hypothalamus, suprachiasmatic nucleus, and the preoptic area (MBH-SCN-POA) was tested under different hormonal conditions with an in vitro superfusion method. GABA significantly decreased LHRH release under(More)
  • 1