Robert A. Greenes

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The Guideline Interchange Format (GLIF) is a language for structured representation of guidelines. It was developed to facilitate sharing clinical guidelines. GLIF version 2 enabled modeling a guideline as a flowchart of structured steps, representing clinical actions and decisions. However, the attributes of structured constructs were defined as text(More)
OBJECTIVE To allow exchange of clinical practice guidelines among institutions and computer-based applications. DESIGN The GuideLine Interchange Format (GLIF) specification consists of GLIF model and the GLIF syntax. The GLIF model is an object-oriented representation that consists of a set of classes for guideline entities, attributes for those classes,(More)
The Guideline Interchange Format (GLIF) is a model for representation of sharable computer-interpretable guidelines. The current version of GLIF (GLIF3) is a substantial update and enhancement of the model since the previous version (GLIF2). GLIF3 enables encoding of a guideline at three levels: a conceptual flowchart, a computable specification that can be(More)
In the assessment of the statistical properties of a diagnostic test, for example the sensitivity and specificity of the test, it is common to derive estimates from a sample limited to those cases for whom subsequent definitive disease verification is obtained. Omission of nonverified cases can seriously bias the estimates. In order to adjust the estimates(More)
OBJECTIVES Many groups are developing computer-interpretable clinical guidelines (CIGs) for use during clinical encounters. CIGs use "Task-Network Models" for representation but differ in their approaches to addressing particular modeling challenges. We have studied similarities and differences between CIGs in order to identify issues that must be resolved(More)
BACKGROUND Many healthcare organizations have implemented adverse event reporting systems in the hope of learning from experience to prevent adverse events and medical errors. However, a number of these applications have failed or not been implemented as predicted. OBJECTIVE This study presents an extended technology acceptance model that integrates(More)
BACKGROUND The use of clinical decision support systems to facilitate the practice of evidence-based medicine promises to substantially improve health care quality. OBJECTIVE To describe, on the basis of the proceedings of the Evidence and Decision Support track at the 2000 AMIA Spring Symposium, the research and policy challenges for capturing research(More)
Monitoring vital signs and locations of certain classes of ambulatory patients can be useful in overcrowded emergency departments and at disaster scenes, both on-site and during transportation. To be useful, such monitoring needs to be portable and low cost, and have minimal adverse impact on emergency personnel, e.g., by not raising an excessive number of(More)
Representation of clinical practice guidelines in a computer-interpretable format is a critical issue for guideline development, implementation, and evaluation. We studied 11 types of guideline representation models that can be used to encode guidelines in computer-interpretable formats. We have consistently found in all reviewed models that primitives for(More)
Clinical guidelines are intended to improve the quality and cost effectiveness of patient care. Integration of guidelines into electronic medical records and order-entry systems, in a way that enables delivery of patient-specific advice at the point of care, is likely to encourage guidelines acceptance and effectiveness. Among the methodologies for modeling(More)