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I Cartography's ontological crisis Maps have long been seen as objective, neutral products of science. Cartography is the means by which the surface of the earth is represented as faithfully as possible. The skill of the cartographer is to capture and portray relevant features accurately. Cartography as an academic and scientific pursuit then largely(More)
'Smart cities' is a term that has gained traction in academia, business and government to describe cities that, on the one hand, are increasingly composed of and monitored by pervasive and ubiquitous computing and, on the other, whose economy and governance is being driven by innovation, creativity and entrepreneurship, enacted by smart people. This paper(More)
In this paper we examine the potential of pervasive computing to create widespread sousveillance, that will complement surveillance, through the development of life-logs; socio-spatial archives that document every action, every event, every conversation, and every material expression of an individual's life. Reflecting on emerging technologies, life-log(More)
The effects of software (code) on the spatial formation of everyday life are best understood through a theoretical framework that utilizes the concepts of technicity (the productive power of technology to make things happen) and transduction (the constant making anew of a domain in reiterative and transformative practices). Examples from the lives of three(More)
In recent years there has been a turn within cartographic theory from a representational to a processual understanding of mapping. Maps have been re-conceptualised as mappings that ceaselessly unfold through contingent , citational, habitual, negotiated, reflexive and playful practices, embedded within relational contexts. In this paper, we explore what(More)