Roald C. Roverud

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  • R C Roverud
  • The Journal of neuroscience : the official…
  • 1993
Microchiropteran bats use an auditory sonar system for orientation and prey capture. Many bats use highly structured constant-frequency (CF) and frequency-modulated (FM) sonar orientation signals. Mechanisms for sound pattern recognition are important for the perception of these and other types of auditory signals. The processing and recognition of FM sound(More)
We examined the relationship between ambient temperature (Ta), body temperature (Tb), oxygen consumption (VO2), carbon dioxide production (VCO2), evaporative water loss (mH2O), respiratory frequency (f), tidal volume (VT), minute volume (VI), and oxygen extraction (EO2) in the Neotropical bat Noctilio albiventris (mean mass 40 g). The factorial aerobic(More)
Bats of the species Rhinolophus rouxi, Hipposideros lankadiva and Eptesicus fuscus were trained to discriminate between two simultaneously presented artificial insect wingbeat targets moving at different wingbeat rates. During the discrimination trials, R. rouxi, H. lankadiva and E. fuscus emitted long-CF/FM, short-CF/FM and FM echolocation sounds(More)
The rufous horseshoe bat, Rhinolophus rouxi, was trained to discriminate differences in target distance. Loud free running artificial pulses, simulating the bat's natural long-CF/FM echolocation sounds, interfered with the ability of the bat to discriminate target distance. Interference occurred when the duration of the CF component of the CF/FM artificial(More)
Big brown bats, Eptesicus fuscus, were presented with artificial frequency modulated (FM) echoes that simulated an object becoming progressively closer to the bat. A stereotyped approach phase behavioral response of the bat to the virtual approaching target was used to determine the ability of the bat to analyze FM signals for target distance information.(More)
A stereotypical approach phase vocalization response of the lesser bulldog bat, Noctilio albiventris, to artificial echoes simulating a virtual approaching object was used to assess the ability of the bat to analyze and extract distance information from the artificial echoes. The performance of the bat was not significantly different when presented with(More)
Bats of the speciesNoctilio albiventris were trained to detect the presence of a target or to discriminate differences in target distance by means of echolocation. During the discrimination trials, the bats emitted pairs of pulses at a rate of 7–10/s. The first was an 8 ms constant frequency (CF) signal at about 75 kHz. This was followed after about 28 ms(More)
Bats of the speciesNoctilio albiventris, trained to discriminate differences in target distance, emitted pairs of pulses at a rate of 7–10/s, the first a constant frequency (CF) pulse of about 8 ms duration and 75 kHz frequency, followed after about 28 ms by a CF/FM pulse having a 6 ms, 75 kHz CF component that terminates in a 2 ms FM sweep to about 57 kHz.(More)
In a two-alternative, forced-choice task lesser bulldog bats were trained to distinguish between a pure tone pulse and a pulse composed of a series of brief tonal steps oscillating between two different frequencies. The tone-step pulse gradually approximates the pure tone pulse as the frequency difference between the steps becomes progressively smaller.(More)
Bats of the speciesNoctilio albiventris emit short-constant frequency/frequency modulated (short-CF/FM) pulses with a CF component frequency at about 75 kHz. Bats sitting on a stationary platform were trained to discriminate target distance by means of echolocation. Loud, free-running artificial pulses, simulating the bat's natural CF/FM echolocation sounds(More)