Richard Szeliski

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Stereo matching is one of the most active research areas in computer vision. While a large number of algorithms for stereo correspondence have been developed, relatively little work has been done on characterizing their performance. In this paper, we present a taxonomy of dense, two-frame stereo methods. Our taxonomy is designed to assess the different(More)
We present a system for interactively browsing and exploring large unstructured collections of photographs of a scene using a novel 3D interface. Our system consists of an image-based modeling front end that automatically computes the viewpoint of each photograph as well as a sparse 3D model of the scene and image to model correspondences. Our <i>photo(More)
The quantitative evaluation of optical flow algorithms by Barron et al. (1994) led to significant advances in performance. The challenges for optical flow algorithms today go beyond the datasets and evaluation methods proposed in that paper. Instead, they center on problems associated with complex natural scenes, including nonrigid motion, real sensor(More)
The ability to interactively control viewpoint while watching a video is an exciting application of image-based rendering. The goal of our work is to render dynamic scenes with interactive viewpoint control using a relatively small number of video cameras. In this paper, we show how high-quality video-based rendering of dynamic scenes can be accomplished(More)
There are billions of photographs on the Internet, comprising the largest and most diverse photo collection ever assembled. How can computer vision researchers exploit this imagery? This paper explores this question from the standpoint of 3D scene modeling and visualization. We present structure-from-motion and image-based rendering algorithms that operate(More)
This paper presents a quantitative comparison of several multi-view stereo reconstruction algorithms. Until now, the lack of suitable calibrated multi-view image datasets with known ground truth (3D shape models) has prevented such direct comparisons. In this paper, we first survey multi-view stereo algorithms and compare them qualitatively using a taxonomy(More)
Many recent computational photography techniques decompose an image into a piecewise smooth base layer, containing large scale variations in intensity, and a residual detail layer capturing the smaller scale details in the image. In many of these applications, it is important to control the spatial scale of the extracted details, and it is often desirable(More)
We present a system that can reconstruct 3D geometry from large, unorganized collections of photographs such as those found by searching for a given city (e.g., Rome) on Internet photo-sharing sites. Our system is built on a set of new, distributed computer vision algorithms for image matching and 3D reconstruction, designed to maximize parallelism at each(More)