Richard R G J Bellerby

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The oceans have absorbed nearly half of the fossil-fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted into the atmosphere since pre-industrial times, causing a measurable reduction in seawater pH and carbonate saturation. If CO2 emissions continue to rise at current rates, upper-ocean pH will decrease to levels lower than have existed for tens of millions of years and,(More)
[1] Primary production and calcification in response to different partial pressures of CO2 (PCO2) (‘‘glacial,’’ ‘‘present,’’ and ‘‘year 2100’’ atmospheric CO2 concentrations) were investigated during a mesocosm bloom dominated by the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi. The day-to-day dynamics of net community production (NCP) and net community calcification(More)
Predicting the ocean's role in the global carbon cycle requires an understanding of the stoichiometric coupling between carbon and growth-limiting elements in biogeochemical processes. A recent addition to such knowledge is that the carbon/nitrogen ratio of inorganic consumption and release of dissolved organic matter may increase in a high-CO(2) world.(More)
Fertilization of the ocean by adding iron compounds has induced diatom-dominated phytoplankton blooms accompanied by considerable carbon dioxide drawdown in the ocean surface layer. However, because the fate of bloom biomass could not be adequately resolved in these experiments, the timescales of carbon sequestration from the atmosphere are uncertain. Here(More)
Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations due to anthropogenic fossil fuel combustion are currently changing the ocean’s chemistry. Increasing oceanic [CO2] and consequently decreasing seawater pH have the potential to significantly impact marine life. Here we describe and analyze the build-up and decline of a natural phytoplankton bloom(More)
The present study investigated the effects of ocean acidification and temperature increase on Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sinistral), the dominant planktonic foraminifer in the Arctic Ocean. Due to the naturally low concentration of CO 3 2− in the Arctic, this foraminifer could be particularly sensitive to the forecast changes in seawater carbonate(More)
Measurement strategies for understanding the oceanic CO(2) (carbon dioxide) system are moving towards in situ and ship of opportunity sampling techniques. Automated instrumentation with high accuracy and sampling frequencies will enable a greater understanding of the fluxes of marine carbon and lead to a more reliable constrain on the calculated uptake of(More)
Stable isotope values are useful for elucidating C and N cycling and pathways in marine and aquatic ecosystems. Variations in the base-line isotope values, the δ13C and δ15N values of phytoplankton, put constraints on their usefulness as tracers for trophic interactions and sources of organic matter in food web studies, however. We investigated the C and N(More)
Iglesias-Rodriguez et al. (Research Articles, 18 April 2008, p. 336) reported that the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi doubles its organic matter production and calcification in response to high carbon dioxide partial pressures, contrary to previous laboratory and field studies. We argue that shortcomings in their experimental protocol compromise the(More)
T. VAN OIJEN*, M. A. VAN LEEUWE, E. GRANUM, F. J. WEISSING, R. G. J. BELLERBY, W. W. C. GIESKES AND H. J. W. DE BAAR 1 DEPARTMENT OF MARINE BIOLOGY, CEES, UNIVERSITY OF GRONINGEN, PO BOX 14, 9750 AA HAREN, THE NETHERLANDS, DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL AND PLANT SCIENCES, UNIVERSITY OF SHEFFIELD, SHEFFIELD S10 2TN, UK, THEORETICAL BIOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF GRONINGEN,(More)