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This paper describes an application of hierarchical or empirical Bayes to the distributed source reconstruction problem in electro- and magnetoencephalography (EEG and MEG). The key contribution is the automatic selection of multiple cortical sources with compact spatial support that are specified in terms of empirical priors. This obviates the need to use(More)
Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings are a rich source of information about the neural dynamics underlying cognitive processes in the brain, with excellent temporal and good spatial resolution. In recent years there have been considerable advances in MEG hardware developments and methods. Sophisticated analysis techniques are now routinely applied and(More)
We describe a simple and efficient solution to the problem of reconstructing electromagnetic sources into a canonical or standard anatomical space. Its simplicity rests upon incorporating subject-specific anatomy into the forward model in a way that eschews the need for cortical surface extraction. The forward model starts with a canonical cortical mesh,(More)
We present an empirical Bayesian scheme for distributed multimodal inversion of electromagnetic forward models of EEG and MEG signals. We used a generative model with common source activity and separate error components for each modality. Under this scheme, the weightings of error for each modality, relative to source components, are estimated automatically(More)
We describe an asymmetric approach to fMRI and MEG/EEG fusion in which fMRI data are treated as empirical priors on electromagnetic sources, such that their influence depends on the MEG/EEG data, by virtue of maximizing the model evidence. This is important if the causes of the MEG/EEG signals differ from those of the fMRI signal. Furthermore, each(More)
Face processing in the human brain recruits a widespread cortical network based mainly in the ventral and lateral temporal and occipital lobes. However, the extent to which activity within this network is driven by different face properties versus being determined by the manner in which faces are processed (as determined by task requirements) remains(More)
Repetition of the same stimulus leads to a reduction in neural activity known as repetition suppression (RS). In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), RS is found for multiple object categories. One proposal is that RS reflects locally based "within-region" changes, such as neural fatigue. Thus, if a given region shows RS across changes in stimulus(More)
Perception of both gaze-direction and symbolic directional cues (e.g. arrows) orient an observer's attention toward the indicated location. It is unclear, however, whether these similar behavioral effects are examples of the same attentional phenomenon and, therefore, subserved by the same neural substrate. It has been proposed that gaze, given its(More)
Most lesion studies in animals, and neuropsychological and functional neuroimaging studies in humans, have focused on finding dissociations between the functions of different brain regions, for example in relation to different types of memory. While some of these dissociations can be questioned, particularly in the case of neuroimaging data, we start by(More)
The neural mechanisms that underlie familiarity memory have been extensively investigated, but a consensus understanding remains elusive. Behavioral evidence suggests that familiarity sometimes shares sources with instances of implicit memory known as priming, in that the same increases in processing fluency that give rise to priming can engender(More)