Richard M Peek

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Approximately 50% of Helicobacter pylori strains produce a cytotoxin, encoded by vacA, that induces vacuolation of eukaryotic cells. Analysis of a clinically isolated tox- strain (Tx30a) indicated secretion of a 93-kDa product from a 3933-base pair vacA open reading frame. Characterization of 59 different H. pylori isolates indicated the existence of three(More)
Although gastric adenocarcinoma is associated with the presence of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach, only a small fraction of colonized individuals develop this common malignancy. H. pylori strain and host genotypes probably influence the risk of carcinogenesis by differentially affecting host inflammatory responses and epithelial-cell physiology.(More)
To determine whether infection with a Helicobacter pylori strain possessing cagA is associated with an increased risk of development of adenocarcinoma of the stomach, we used a nested case-control study based on a cohort of 5443 Japanese-American men in Oahu, Hawaii, who had a physical examination and a phlebotomy during 1967 to 1970. We matched 103 H.(More)
Infection with Helicobacter pylori cagA-positive strains is associated with gastric adenocarcinoma. Intestinal metaplasia is a precancerous lesion of the stomach characterized by transdifferentiation of the gastric mucosa to an intestinal phenotype. The H. pylori cagA gene product, CagA, is delivered into gastric epithelial cells, where it undergoes(More)
Helicobacter pylori is the dominant species of the human gastric microbiome, and colonization causes a persistent inflammatory response. H. pylori-induced gastritis is the strongest singular risk factor for cancers of the stomach; however, only a small proportion of infected individuals develop malignancy. Carcinogenic risk is modified by strain-specific(More)
Helicobacter pylori is a gastric pathogen that colonizes approximately 50% of the world's population. Infection with H. pylori causes chronic inflammation and significantly increases the risk of developing duodenal and gastric ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Infection with H. pylori is the strongest known risk factor for gastric cancer, which is the(More)
Helicobacter pylori colonization leads to epithelial cell hyperproliferation within inflamed mucosa, but levels of apoptosis vary, suggesting that imbalances between rates of cell production and loss may contribute to differences in gastric cancer risk among infected populations. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) regulates(More)
Helicobacter pylori enhances the risk for ulcer disease and gastric cancer, yet only a minority of H. pylori-colonized individuals develop disease. We examined the ability of two H. pylori isolates to induce differential host responses in vivo or in vitro, and then used an H. pylori whole genome microarray to identify bacterial determinants related to(More)
Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human stomach for decades unless pharmacologically eradicated. We hypothesized that this flagellated pathogen escapes immune clearance, in part, by avoiding detection by the flagellin receptor Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5). In contrast to other gram-negative microbes, H. pylori did not release flagellin. Furthermore,(More)
BACKGROUND & AIMS vacA encodes the vacuolating cytotoxin of Helicobacter pylori and exhibits marked variation in signal sequence and midgene coding regions. The implications for gastroduodenal pathology are unknown. The aim of this study was to define the association of vacA genotype with gastric inflammation and injury, in vitro cytotoxin activity, and(More)