Richard L. Huganir

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Bidirectional changes in the efficacy of neuronal synaptic transmission, such as hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), are thought to be mechanisms for information storage in the brain. LTP and LTD may be mediated by the modulation of AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazloe proprionic acid) receptor(More)
The regulated incorporation of AMPA receptors into synapses is important for synaptic plasticity. Here we examine the role of protein kinase A (PKA) in this process. We found that PKA phosphorylation of the AMPA receptor subunits GluR4 and GluR1 directly controlled the synaptic incorporation of AMPA receptors in organotypic slices from rat hippocampus.(More)
We have characterized the phosphorylation of the glutamate receptor subunit GluR1, using biochemical and electrophysiological techniques. GluR1 is phosphorylated on multiple sites that are all located on the C-terminus of the protein. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase specifically phosphorylates SER-845 of GluR1 in transfected HEK cells and in neurons in(More)
AMPA glutamate receptors mediate the majority of rapid excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and play a role in the synaptic plasticity underlying learning and memory. AMPA receptors are heteromeric complexes of four homologous subunits (GluR1-4) that differentially combine to form a variety of AMPA receptor subtypes. These subunits(More)
Synaptic clustering of neurotransmitter receptors is crucial for efficient signal transduction and integration in neurons. PDZ domain-containing proteins such as PSD-95/SAP90 interact with the intracellular C termini of a variety of receptors and are thought to be important in the targeting and anchoring of receptors to specific synapses. Here, we show that(More)
Spatial localization and clustering of membrane proteins is critical to neuronal development and synaptic plasticity. Recent studies have identified a family of proteins, the PDZ proteins, that contain modular PDZ domains and interact with synaptic ionotropic glutamate receptors and ion channels. PDZ proteins are thought to have a role in defining the(More)
Several MAPK cascades have been characterized in mammalian cells (reviewed extensively by Cobb and colleagues) of which the best-studied involves the activation of ERK1 and ERK2 in response to growth factors and other stimuli. To activate ERK1 and ERK2, extracellular stimuli cause (through mechanisms that have been reviewed extensively elsewhere) an(More)
PSD-95, DLG, ZO-1 (PDZ) domain-mediated protein interactions have been shown to play important roles in the regulation of glutamate receptor function at excitatory synapses. Recent studies demonstrating the rapid regulation of AMPA receptor function during synaptic plasticity have suggested that AMPA receptor interaction with PDZ domain-containing proteins(More)
The cellular processes that govern neuronal function are highly complex, with many basic cell biological pathways uniquely adapted to perform the elaborate information processing achieved by the brain. This is particularly evident in the trafficking and regulation of membrane proteins to and from synapses, which can be a long distance away from the cell(More)
Both theoretical and experimental work have suggested that central neurons compensate for changes in excitatory synaptic input in order to maintain a relatively constant output. We report here that inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission in cultured spinal neurons leads to an increase in mEPSC amplitudes, accompanied by an equivalent increase in the(More)