Richard J. H. Smith

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Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most frequent cause of irreversible blindness in the elderly in developed countries. Our previous studies implicated activation of complement in the formation of drusen, the hallmark lesion of AMD. Here, we show that factor H (HF1), the major inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway, accumulates within(More)
1-[6-[[17 beta-3-Methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino]hexyl]- 1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (U-73122), an inhibitor of phospholipase C (PLC)-dependent processes in human platelets, was found to be a potent inhibitor of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) activation by structurally unrelated receptor-specific agonists. U-73122 caused a time- and(More)
Aggregation of human platelets induced by a variety of agonists was inhibited by 1-[6-[[17 beta-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl] amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dionel (U-73122) (IC50 values 1-5 microM), but not by the close analog 1-[6-[[17 beta-3-methoxyestra- 1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino]hexyl]-2,5-pyrrolidine-dione (U-73343) in which pyrrolidinedione(More)
We have determined the molecular basis for Usher syndrome type 1F (USH1F) in two families segregating for this type of syndromic deafness. By fluorescence in situ hybridization, we placed the human homolog of the mouse protocadherin Pcdh15 in the linkage interval defined by the USH1F locus. We determined the genomic structure of this novel protocadherin,(More)
Genes causing nonsyndromic autosomal recessive deafness (DFNB12) and deafness associated with retinitis pigmentosa and vestibular dysfunction (USH1D) were previously mapped to overlapping regions of chromosome 10q21-q22. Seven highly consanguineous families segregating nonsyndromic autosomal recessive deafness were analyzed to refine the DFNB12 locus. In a(More)
Hearing impairment is the most common sensory disorder, present in 1 of every 500 newborns. With 46 genes implicated in nonsyndromic hearing loss, it is also an extremely heterogeneous trait. Here, we categorize for the first time all mutations reported in nonsyndromic deafness genes, both worldwide and more specifically in Caucasians. The most frequent(More)
Mutations in GJB2, the gene encoding connexin-26 at the DFNB1 locus on 13q12, are found in as many as 50% of subjects with autosomal recessive, nonsyndromic prelingual hearing impairment. However, genetic diagnosis is complicated by the fact that 10%-50% of affected subjects with GJB2 mutations carry only one mutant allele. Recently, a deletion truncating(More)
Hearing impairment (HI) affects 1 in 650 newborns, which makes it the most common congenital sensory impairment. Despite extraordinary genetic heterogeneity, mutations in one gene, GJB2, which encodes the connexin 26 protein and is involved in inner ear homeostasis, are found in up to 50% of patients with autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss.(More)
Autosomal-dominant sensorineural hearing loss is genetically heterogeneous, with a phenotype closely resembling presbycusis, the most common sensory defect associated with aging in humans. We have identified SLC17A8, which encodes the vesicular glutamate transporter-3 (VGLUT3), as the gene responsible for DFNA25, an autosomal-dominant form of progressive,(More)
CONTEXT Mutations in the GJB2 gene are the most common known cause of inherited congenital severe-to-profound deafness. The carrier frequency of these mutations is not known. OBJECTIVES To determine the carrier rate of deafness-causing mutations in GJB2 in the midwestern United States and the prevalence of these mutations in persons with congenital(More)