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Experiments previously reported in the literature suggest that people with dyslexia have a deficit in categorical perception. However, it is still unclear whether the deficit is specific to the perception of speech sounds or whether it more generally affects auditory function. In order to investigate the relationship between categorical perception and(More)
Perceptual discrimination between speech sounds belonging to different phoneme categories is better than that between sounds falling within the same category. This property, known as "categorical perception," is weaker in children affected by dyslexia. Categorical perception develops from the predispositions of newborns for discriminating all potential(More)
Within an uniform acoustic tube, regions having specific acoustic properties were defined [1, 2] and were at the origin of the Distinctive Region Model (DRM). Such a model has its own intrinsic phonology to produce distinctive sounds. In fact, the regions correspond to the main consonant places of articulation. Such results encourage to study the main(More)
Approaches to characterizing and explaining the diverse phonologies of the world's languages usually begin with data from the analysis of speech signals or from the results of speech production and perception experiments. In the present paper, the dynamic acoustic properties that arise from changing the shape of a simple acoustic tube 18cm length (without(More)
In this paper, the perceptual effects of vowel-to-vowel transitions determined by different temporal variations of model parameters which specify the shapes of the vocal tract area function are investigated. It is shown that, (a) the method of deformation of the vocal tract area function between two targets can be perceptually important and (b) conversely,(More)