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This paper examines the amount of time that care-home residents spend in bed at night, focusing on how residents' bedtimes and getting-up times are managed. Using a mixed-methods approach, diary data were collected over 14 days from 125 residents in ten care homes in South East England. The findings indicate that residents spent, on average, nearly 11 hours(More)
This paper describes a system dynamics model for social care, developed in collaboration with a local authority in England, as part of the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council Care Life Cycle project based at the University of Southampton. The model was populated with data from a wide range of sources, local and national. We present some(More)
Sleep disturbances are a common problem among institutionalized older people. Studies have shown that this population experiences prolonged sleep latency, increased fragmentation and wake after sleep onset, more disturbed circadian rhythms, and night-day reversal. However, studies have not examined the extent to which this is because of individual factors(More)
In divergent ways, both government policy and care home practices influence the everyday life of older people living in English care homes. The rhetoric of choice for care home residents may be in conflict with the reality of government policy-driven service delivery. The aim of the article is to examine the role of organised activities in facilitating(More)
This article presents the key findings from an extensive research project aiming to identify the determinants of poor sleep in care homes. A mixed methods study was conducted in 10 care homes in South East England. This included 2-week daily diaries completed by 145 older residents and interviews with 50 care-home staff. This research demonstrated that the(More)
Introduction The National Centre for Research Methods (NCRM) typology was originally developed by Beissel-Durrant (2004). That typology provides a hierarchical classification of research methods used in the Social Sciences and has been used by the NCRM to categorise training events, research activities and other outputs and has become one of the most(More)
Introduction: Sleep plays a significant role in the lives of older people experiencing institutional long-term care. It relates to their well being yet may also indicate a lack of stimulus and motivation to stay alert and participate in everyday life. However, to date the importance of sleep in this context has not been widely addressed.
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