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Mental Imagery and Visual Working Memory
TLDR
It is shown that performance in visual working memory - but not iconic visual memory - can be predicted by the strength of mental imagery as assessed with binocular rivalry in a given individual, suggesting a dichotomy in strategies for visualWorking memory. Expand
The blind mind: No sensory visual imagery in aphantasia
TLDR
Sensory imagery in subjectively self-diagnosed aphantasics is measured, using the binocular rivalry paradigm, as well as measuring their self-rated object and spatial imagery with multiple questionnaires, which suggest that aphantasia is a condition involving a lack of sensory and phenomenal imagery, and not a loss of metacognition. Expand
Imagine that: elevated sensory strength of mental imagery in individuals with Parkinson's disease and visual hallucinations
TLDR
Together, hallucinations and mental imagery predicted multiple abnormalities in functional connectivity both within and between the attentional control networks, as measured with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Expand
The sensory strength of voluntary visual imagery predicts visual working memory capacity.
TLDR
The results suggest that luminance was disrupting sensory mechanisms common to both visual working memory and imagery, and not a general working memory system, and the disruptive selectivity of background luminance suggests that good imagers, unlike moderate or poor imager, may use imagery as a mnemonic strategy to perform the visual workingMemory task. Expand
A cognitive profile of multi-sensory imagery, memory and dreaming in aphantasia
TLDR
It is shown that compared to control participants with imagery ability, aphantasic individuals report decreased imagery in other sensory domains, although not all report a complete lack of multi-sensory imagery, suggesting a constructive role for visual imagery in representing episodic events. Expand
Cortical excitability controls the strength of mental imagery
TLDR
Brain imaging and transcranial magnetic phosphene data show that lower resting activity and excitability levels in visual cortex, but higher levels in prefrontal cortex, predict stronger sensory imagery, suggesting a neurophysiological mechanism of network cortical excitability that controls the strength of mental images. Expand
Redefining Visual Working Memory: A Cognitive-Strategy, Brain-Region Approach
The ability to remember and manipulate visual information is pervasive and is associated with many cognitive abilities. Yet despite the importance of visual working memory (VWM), there is littleExpand
Attention driven phantom vision: measuring the sensory strength of attentional templates and their relation to visual mental imagery and aphantasia
TLDR
Investigating the relationship between these two forms of non-retinal phantom vision through the use of the binocular rivalry technique finds that attentional templates correlate with both feature-based attention and visual imagery. Expand
The perceptual and phenomenal capacity of mental imagery
TLDR
It is demonstrated that visual imagery is severely limited by the perceptual and phenomenal bottleneck of visual representation, and a novel technique to measure the sensory capacity of mental imagery is introduced, while removing the need for memory and any direct subjective reports. Expand
Cortical excitability controls the strength of mental imagery
TLDR
Brain imaging and transcranial magnetic phosphene data show that lower resting activity and excitability levels in early visual cortex predict stronger sensory imagery, and electrically decreasing visual cortex excitability using tDCS increases imagery strength, suggesting a neurophysiological mechanism of cortical excitability involved in controlling the strength of mental images. Expand
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