Razya Ladelsky

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The most popular I/O virtualization method today is paravirtual I/O. Its popularity stems from its reasonable performance levels while allowing the host to interpose, i.e., inspect or control, the guest's I/O activity. We show that paravirtual I/O performance still significantly lags behind that of state-of-the-art non-interposing I/O virtualization, SRIOV.(More)
1 2 Harm Munk et al. Streaming applications are built of data-driven, computational components, consuming and producing unbounded data streams. Streaming oriented systems have become dominant in a wide range of domains, including embedded applications and DSPs. However, programming efficiently for streaming architectures is a challenging task, having to(More)
The traditional "trap and emulate" I/O paravirtualization model conveniently allows for I/O interposition, yet it inherently incurs costly guest-host context switches. The newer "sidecore" model eliminates this overhead by dedicating host (side)cores to poll the relevant guest memory regions and react accordingly without context switching. But the(More)
Para-virtualization is the leading approach in IO device virtualization. It allows the hypervisor to interpose on and inspect a virtual machine's I/O traffic at run-time. Examples of such interfaces are KVM's virtio [6] and VMWare's VMXNET [7]. Current implementations of virtual I/O in the hypervisor have been shown to have performance and scalability(More)
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