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Four rats responded under a "self-control" procedure designed to obtain delay-discount functions within sessions. Each session consisted of seven blocks, with seven trials within each block. Each block consisted of two initial forced-choice trials followed by five free-choice trials. On choice trials, the rats could press either of two retractable levers. A(More)
The purpose of the present research was to utilize quantitative methods to identify behavioral mechanisms involved in the effects of stimulant drugs on choice in a self-control procedure. A logarithmic equation based upon a combination of the matching law and hyperbolic discounting was used to separate drug-induced changes in sensitivity to reinforcement(More)
In the present study, effects of d-amphetamine on sensitivity to reinforcement amount under concurrent schedules were examined using a rapid-acquisition procedure. Four pigeons key pecked under single concurrent variable-interval 30-s schedules of grain presentation. Two different reinforcer-amount ratios (7:1 and 1:7) changed across sessions according to a(More)
Four pigeons were trained on concurrent variable-interval 30-s schedules. Relative reinforcer amounts arranged across the two alternatives were varied across sessions according to a pseudorandom binary sequence [cf., Hunter, I., Davison, M., 1985. Determination of a behavioral transfer function: white-noise analysis of session-to-session response-ratio(More)
Identity matching-to-sample has been difficult to demonstrate in rats, but most studies have used visual stimuli. There is evidence that rats can acquire complex forms of olfactory stimulus control, and the present study explored the possibility that identity matching might be facilitated in rats if olfactory stimuli were used. Four rats were trained on an(More)
The purpose of this study was to examine effects of d-amphetamine on choice controlled by reinforcement delay. Eight pigeons responded under a concurrent-chains procedure in which one terminal-link schedule was always fixed-interval 8 s, and the other terminal-link schedule changed from session to session between fixed-interval 4 s and fixed-interval 16 s(More)
Repeated-acquisition procedures that include performance controls for effects not specific to acquisition permit the assessment of drug effects on learning on a within-subject, within-session basis. Despite the advantages of this methodology, few studies have examined effects of psychomotor stimulants on repeated acquisition in rodents. The purpose of the(More)
Key pecking by pigeons was maintained on a chained fixed-interval 4-min (12-min for 1 subject) fixed-ratio 1 schedule of food presentation. Attacks toward a restrained and protected conspecific were recorded. In the first experiment, the amount of food presented per interval was manipulated across phases by varying the number of fixed ratios required in the(More)
A half-century of research in behavioral pharmacology leaves little doubt that behavior-environment contingencies can determine the behavioral effects of drugs. Unfortunately, a coherent behavior-analytic framework within which to characterize the myriad ways in which contingencies interact with drugs, and to predict effects of a given drug under a given(More)