Ray Woosley

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Approximately 10% to 20% of patients who undergo selective transsphenoidal removal of secreting microadenomas fail to achieve a cure. One of the possible causes of these failures is multiple adenomas. A case history is presented of two microadenomas within the same gland, and the multiplicity of pituitary adenomas is discussed.
The authors present a case of delayed myelopathy arising 8 years after a stab wound to the thoracic spine, with intradural retention of the knife tip. Following removal of the knife tip, the patient had a good recovery. A review of the literature documents eight additional cases of delayed myelopathy secondary to retained fragments from spinal stab wounds.
BACKGROUND Ongoing regimens of haloperidol, thioridazine, and lorazepam are commonly administered to manage behavior problems in nursing home residents. Nevertheless, there is controversy over whether periodic drug withdrawal should be attempted when those medications are prescribed. This study addressed that issue by examining the effects of discontinuing(More)
Circulating peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations were analysed in patients with primary intracranial neoplasia. Patients with tumours of glial origin demonstrated a significant depletion of E-rosetting lymphocytes whereas the quantitative lymphocyte profiles of patients with non-glial brain tumours were normal. The number of immunoglobulin and Fe(More)
Transsphenoidal exploration was performed on 37 patients with hyperprolactinemia and a sellar polytomographic picture consistent with an adenoma. Twenty-two patients were found to have a microadenoma, and 14 were found to have macroadenomas. In one patient who had recently received bromocriptine, no tumor was found. Seventy-two percent of patients with(More)
AbstrAct Adverse drug events impose a large cost on the society in terms of lives and health care costs. In this article, we propose an information technology architecture for enabling the monitoring of adverse drug events in an outpatient setting as a part of the post marketing surveillance program. The proposed system architecture enables the development(More)
To properly diagnose and treat the Chiari I malformation, it is necessary to know: 1) the position of the cerebellar tonsils; 2) the degree of compression of the upper cervical cord and medulla; 3) the status of the spinal cord, particularly whether a syringohydromyelic condition exists; 4) whether basal arachnoiditis is present; 5) the nature of the(More)