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How much adversarial noise can protocols for interactive communication tolerate? This question was examined by Braverman and Rao (IEEE Trans. Inf. Theory, 2014) for the case of “robust” protocols, where each party sends messages only in fixed and predetermined rounds. We consider a new class of protocols for interactive communication, which we(More)
We consider the question of interactive communication, in which two remote parties perform a computation, while their communication channel is (adversarially) noisy. We extend here the discussion into a more general and stronger class of noise, namely, we allow the channel to perform <italic>insertions</italic> and <italic>deletions</italic> of symbols.(More)
We consider the task of communicating a data stream-a long, possibly infinite message not known in advance to the sender-over a channel with adversarial noise. For any given noise rate c &lt;; 1, we show an efficient, constant-rate scheme that correctly decodes a (1 - c) fraction of the stream sent so far with high probability, or aborts if the noise rate(More)
In this work, we study position-based cryptography in the quantum setting. The aim is to use the geographical position of a party as its only credential. On the negative side, we show that if adversaries are allowed to share an arbitrarily large entangled quantum state, the task of secure position-verification is impossible. To this end, we prove the(More)
The nonlocal behavior of quantum mechanics can be used to generate guaranteed fresh randomness from an untrusted device that consists of two nonsignalling components; since the generation process requires some initial fresh randomness to act as a catalyst, one also speaks of randomness expansion. R. Colbeck and A. Kent [J. Phys. A 44, 095305 (2011)](More)
In this work, we study the fundamental problem of reliable interactive communication over a noisy channel. In a breakthrough sequence of papers published in 1992 and 1993 [Sch92, Sch93], Schulman gave non-constructive proofs of the existence of general methods to emulate any two-party interactive protocol such that: (1) the emulation protocol only takes a(More)
We revisit the problem of reliable interactive communication over a noisy channel, and obtain the first fully explicit (randomized) efficient constant-rate emulation procedure for reliable interactive communication. Our protocol works for any discrete memory less noisy channel with constant capacity, and fails with exponentially small probability in the(More)
We revisit the problem of reliable interactive communication over a noisy channel and obtain the first fully (randomized) efficient constant-rate emulation procedure for reliable interactive communication. Our protocol works for any discrete memoryless noisy channel with constant capacity and fails with exponentially small probability in the total length of(More)
We provide tight upper and lower bounds on the noise resilience of interactive communication over noisy channels with <i>feedback</i>. In this setting, we show that the maximal fraction of noise that any robust protocol can resist is 1/3. Additionally, we provide a simple and efficient robust protocol that succeeds as long as the fraction of noise is at(More)