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In this paper we address the problem of minimizing a large class of energy functions that occur in early vision. The major restriction is that the energy function’s smoothness term must only involve pairs of pixels. We propose two algorithms that use graph cuts to compute a local minimum even when very large moves are allowed. The first move we consider is(More)
In the last few years, several new algorithms based on graph cuts have been developed to solve energy minimization problems in computer vision. Each of these techniques constructs a graph such that the minimum cut on the graph also minimizes the energy. Yet, because these graph constructions are complex and highly specific to a particular energy function,(More)
We define a new image feature called the color correlogram and use it for image indexing and comparison. This feature distills the spatial correlation of colors, and is both effective and inexpensive for content-based image retrieval. The correlogramrobustly tolerates large changes in appearance and shape caused by changes in viewing positions, camera(More)
Several new algorithms for visual correspondence based on graph cuts [7, 14, 17] have recently been developed. While these methods give very strong results in practice, they do not handle occlusions properly. Specifically, they treat the two input images asymmetrically, and they do not ensure that a pixel corresponds to at most one pixel in the other image.(More)
Among the most exciting advances in early vision has been the development of efficient energy minimization algorithms for pixel-labeling tasks such as depth or texture computation. It has been known for decades that such problems can be elegantly expressed as Markov random fields, yet the resulting energy minimization problems have been widely viewed as(More)
Color histograms are used to compare images in many applications. Their advantages are efficiency, and insensitivity to small changes in camera viewpoint. However, color histograms lack spatial information, so images with very different appearances can have similar histograms. For example, a picture of fall foliage might contain a large number of scattered(More)
Color histograms are widely used for content-based image retrieval. Their advantages are efficiency, and insensitivity to small changes in camera viewpoint. However, a histogram is a coarse characterization of an image, and so images with very different appearances can have similar histograms. We describe a technique for comparing images called histogram(More)