Ralph B Chapman

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BACKGROUND Housing is an important environmental influence on population health, and there is growing evidence of health effects from indoor environment characteristics such as low indoor temperatures. However, there is relatively little research, and thus little firm guidance, on the cost-effectiveness of public policies to retrospectively improve the(More)
OBJECTIVE To determine whether insulating existing houses increases indoor temperatures and improves occupants' health and wellbeing. DESIGN Community based, cluster, single blinded randomised study. SETTING Seven low income communities in New Zealand. PARTICIPANTS 1350 households containing 4407 participants. INTERVENTION Installation of a standard(More)
OBJECTIVE To assess whether non-polluting, more effective home heating (heat pump, wood pellet burner, flued gas) has a positive effect on the health of children with asthma. DESIGN Randomised controlled trial. SETTING Households in five communities in New Zealand. PARTICIPANTS 409 children aged 6-12 years with doctor diagnosed asthma. INTERVENTIONS(More)
Houses designed for one climate and cultural group may not be appropriate for other places and people. Our aim is to find cost-effective ways to improve the characteristics of older homes, ill-fitted for New Zealand’s climate, in order to improve the occupants’ health. We have carried out two community randomised trials, in partnership with local(More)
BACKGROUND There is increased interest in the effectiveness and co-benefits of measures to promote walking and cycling, including health gains from increased physical activity and reductions in fossil fuel use and vehicle emissions. This paper analyses the changes in walking and cycling in two New Zealand cities that accompanied public investment in(More)
BACKGROUND Policy advisers are seeking robust evidence on the effectiveness of measures, such as promoting walking and cycling, that potentially offer multiple benefits, including enhanced health through physical activity, alongside reductions in energy use, traffic congestion and carbon emissions. This paper outlines the 'ACTIVE' study, designed to test(More)
Understanding cities comprehensively as systems is a costly challenge and is typically not feasible for policy makers. Nevertheless, focusing on some key systemic characteristics of cities can give useful insights for policy to advance health and well-being outcomes. Moreover, if we take a coevolutionary systems view of cities, some conventional assumptions(More)
Cycling and walking are transport modes that have potential public health and environmental benefits when they replace travel by private motor vehicles. The New Zealand Model Communities Programme, consisted of infrastructure construction and promotion of active travel. The overall impact of the programme on active travel has been analysed previously,(More)