Rahul Y Mahida

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Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome is characterized by fibrotic obliteration of small airways which severely impairs graft function and survival after lung transplantation. Bronchial epithelial cells from the transplanted lung can undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition and this can be accentuated by activated macrophages. Macrophages demonstrate(More)
Lung transplantation is a well-established treatment option for selected patients with end-stage lung disease, leading to improved survival and improved quality of life. The last 20 years have seen a steady growth in number of lung transplantation procedures performed worldwide. The increase in clinical activity has been associated with tremendous progress(More)
Bacterial infections after lung transplantation cause airway epithelial injury and are associated with an increased risk of developing bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. The damaged epithelium is a source of alarmins that activate the innate immune system, yet their ability to activate fibroblasts in the development of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome has(More)
A novel actinomycete, strain N1286(T), isolated from a lung transplant patient with a pulmonary infection, was provisionally assigned to the genus Nocardia. The strain had chemotaxonomic and morphological properties typical of members of the genus Nocardia and formed a distinct phyletic line in the Nocardia 16S rRNA gene tree. Isolate N1286(T) was most(More)
It has been proposed that peptide epitopes bind to MHC class II molecules to form distinct structural conformers of the same MHC II-peptide complex termed type A and type B, and that the two conformers of the same peptide-MHC II complex are recognized by distinct CD4 T cells, termed type A and type B T cells. Both types recognize short synthetic peptides(More)
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