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Cross-species chromosome painting was used to investigate genome rearrangements between tammar wallaby Macropus eugenii (2n = 16) and the swamp wallaby Wallabia bicolor (2n = 10♀/11♂), which diverged about 6 million years ago. The swamp wallaby has an XX female:XY1Y2 male sex chromosome system thought to have resulted from a fusion between an autosome and(More)
The parental conflict, or kinship, theory of genomic imprinting predicts that parent-specific gene expression may evolve in species in which parental investment in developing offspring is unequal. This theory explains many aspects of parent-of-origin transcriptional silencing of embryonic growth regulatory genes in mammals, but it has not been tested in any(More)
The first centromeric protein identified in any species was CENP-A, a divergent member of the histone H3 family that was recognised by autoantibodies from patients with scleroderma-spectrum disease. It has recently been suggested to rename this protein CenH3. Here, we argue that the original name should be maintained both because it is the basis of a long(More)
Ecological transitions from marine to freshwater environments have been important in the creation of diversity among fishes. Evolutionary changes associated with these transitions likely involve modifications of osmoregulatory function. In particular, relaxed selection on hypo-osmoregulation should strongly affect animals that transition into novel(More)
A preliminary genome sequence has been assembled for the Southern Ocean salp, Salpa thompsoni (Urochordata, Thaliacea). Despite the ecological importance of this species in Antarctic pelagic food webs and its potential role as an indicator of changing Southern Ocean ecosystems in response to climate change, no genomic resources are available for S.(More)
Multiple Genome Rearrangement (MGR) analysis was used to define the trajectory and pattern of chromosome rearrangement within muroid rodents. MGR was applied using 107 chromosome homologies between Mus, Rattus, Peromyscus, the muroid sister taxon Cricetulus griseus, and Sciurus carolinensis as a non-Muroidea outgroup, with specific attention paid to(More)
The proper functioning of centromeres requires a complex cascade of epigenetic events involving chromatin and kinetochore assembly; however, the precise mechanism by which this cascade proceeds is unknown. The pivotal event during kinetochore formation is the “loading,” or deposition, of CENP-A. This histone H3 variant is specific to centromeres and(More)
The pericentromere and centromere regions of the genome have previously been considered tightly compacted and transcriptionally inert. However, there is mounting evidence that these regions not only actively produce transcripts but that these pericentric and centromeric transcripts are also vital to maintaining genome stability and proper cell division. In(More)
An enduring question surrounding sex chromosome evolution is whether effective hemizygosity in the heterogametic sex leads inevitably to dosage compensation of sex-linked genes, and whether this compensation has been observed in a variety of organisms. Incongruence in the conclusions reached in some recent reports has been attributed to different(More)
The transcriptional framework of the eukaryotic centromere core has been described in budding yeast and rice, but for most eukaryotes and all vertebrates it remains largely unknown. The lack of large pericentric repeats in the tammar wallaby has made it possible to map and identify the transcriptional units at the centromere in a mammalian species for the(More)