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An unusual supernova in the error box of the γ-ray burst of 25 April 1998
TLDR
We report the discovery of transient optical emission in the error box of the γ-ray burst GRB980425, the light curve of which was very different from that of previous optical afterglows associated with β�-ray bursts. Expand
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Long γ-ray bursts and core-collapse supernovae have different environments
When massive stars exhaust their fuel, they collapse and often produce the extraordinarily bright explosions known as core-collapse supernovae. On occasion, this stellar collapse also powers an evenExpand
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An Extremely Luminous Panchromatic Outburst from the Nucleus of a Distant Galaxy
A recent bright emission observed by the Swift satellite is due to the sudden accretion of a star onto a massive black hole. Variable x-ray and γ-ray emission is characteristic of the most extremeExpand
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A very energetic supernova associated with the γ-ray burst of 29 March 2003
Over the past five years evidence has mounted that long-duration (>2 s) γ-ray bursts (GRBs)—the most luminous of all astronomical explosions—signal the collapse of massive stars in our Universe. ThisExpand
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A short γ-ray burst apparently associated with an elliptical galaxy at redshift z = 0.225
Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) come in two classes: long (> 2 s), soft-spectrum bursts and short, hard events. Most progress has been made on understanding the long GRBs, which are typically observed atExpand
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A γ-ray burst at a redshift of z ≈ 8.2
Long-duration γ-ray bursts (GRBs) are thought to result from the explosions of certain massive stars, and some are bright enough that they should be observable out to redshifts of z > 20 usingExpand
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No supernovae associated with two long-duration γ-ray bursts
It is now accepted that long-duration γ-ray bursts (GRBs) are produced during the collapse of a massive star1,2. The standard ‘collapsar’ model3 predicts that a broad-lined and luminous type IcExpand
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A giant γ-ray flare from the magnetar SGR 1806–20
Two classes of rotating neutron stars—soft γ-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars—are magnetars, whose X-ray emission is powered by a very strong magnetic field (B ≈ 1015 G). SGRsExpand
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An optical supernova associated with the X-ray flash XRF 060218
Long-duration γ-ray bursts (GRBs) are associated with type Ic supernovae that are more luminous than average and that eject material at very high velocities. Less-luminous supernovae were notExpand
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The Emergence of a Lanthanide-Rich Kilonova Following the Merger of Two Neutron Stars
We report the discovery and monitoring of the near-infrared counterpart (AT2017gfo) of a binary neutron-star merger event detected as a gravitational wave source by Advanced Laser InterferometerExpand
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