• Publications
  • Influence
Desert ant navigation: how miniature brains solve complex tasks
  • R. Wehner
  • Biology
    Journal of Comparative Physiology A
  • 23 July 2003
TLDR
The general message is that Cataglyphis uses path integration as an egocentric guideline to acquire continually updated spatial information about places and routes, and relies on procedural knowledge, and largely context-dependent retrieval of such knowledge, rather than on all-embracing geocentred representations of space.
Searching behaviour of desert ants, genusCataglyphis (Formicidae, Hymenoptera)
TLDR
What is especially characteristic of the ant's searching pattern is the oscillatingd/t-function which clearly demonstrates that the searching ant repeatedly returns to the origin, even after it has walked, within one hour, along a search trajectory of more than 1 km.
Polarization vision--a uniform sensory capacity?
  • R. Wehner
  • Physics
    The Journal of experimental biology
  • 15 July 2001
TLDR
The hypothesis entertained in this account is that polarization vision comes in various guises, and that the answer to the question posed in the title is most probably no.
‘Matched filters’ — neural models of the external world
  • R. Wehner
  • Psychology
    Journal of Comparative Physiology A
  • 1 July 1987
The Ant Odometer: Stepping on Stilts and Stumps
Desert ants, Cataglyphis, navigate in their vast desert habitat by path integration. They continuously integrate directions steered (as determined by their celestial compass) and distances traveled,
Pinpointing food sources: olfactory and anemotactic orientation in desert ants, Cataglyphis fortis.
TLDR
Elimination of olfactory input by clipping the antennal flagella, or of wind perception by immobilising the bases of the antennae, altered the foraging behaviour of the ants in ways that supported these interpretations.
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