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The sound emission pattern of the echolocating bat, Eptesicus fuscus
The emission pattern of Eptesicus fuscus was found to be consistent with those of the other frequency‐modulating (FM) bats studied in similar detail in that there is a mainlobe aimed forward of theExpand
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Role of syringeal muscles in controlling the phonology of bird song.
1. The contribution of syringeal muscles to controlling the phonology of song was studied by recording bilateral airflow, subsyringeal air sac pressure, electromyograms (EMGs) of six syringealExpand
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The sound emission pattern and the acoustical role of the noseleaf in the echolocating bat, Carollia perspicillata.
  • D. Hartley, R. Suthers
  • Physics, Medicine
  • The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
  • 1 December 1987
Carollia perspicillata (Phyllostomidae) is a frugivorous bat that emits low-intensity, broadband, frequency-modulated echolocation pulses through nostrils surrounded by a noseleaf. The emissionExpand
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Role of syringeal muscles in gating airflow and sound production in singing brown thrashers.
1. The role of syringeal muscles in song production, particularly in regulating airflow through the syrinx, was studied in singing brown thrashers (Toxostoma rufum). In nine individuals, muscleExpand
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The neuromuscular control of birdsong.
Birdsong requires complex learned motor skills involving the coordination of respiratory, vocal organ and craniomandibular muscle groups. Recent studies have added to our understanding of how theseExpand
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Old world frog and bird vocalizations contain prominent ultrasonic harmonics.
  • P. Narins, A. Feng, +4 authors C. Xu
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
  • 30 January 2004
Several groups of mammals such as bats, dolphins and whales are known to produce ultrasonic signals which are used for navigation and hunting by means of echolocation, as well as for communication.Expand
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Optomotor Responses by Echolocating Bats
Optomotor responses to moving stripes have been elicited from nine species of Microchiroptera. The minimum separable visual angle of two phyllostomids, under the experimental conditions, probablyExpand
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Inflation of the esophagus and vocal tract filtering in ring doves
SUMMARY Ring doves vocalize with their beaks and nostrils closed, exhaling into inflatable chambers in the head and neck region. The source sound produced at the syrinx contains a fundamentalExpand
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Peripheral control and lateralization of birdsong.
  • R. Suthers
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of neurobiology
  • 5 November 1997
Recent studies on several species of oscine songbirds show that they achieve their varied vocal performances through coordinated activity of respiratory, syringeal, and other vocal tract muscles inExpand
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Airflow and pressure during canary song: direct evidence for mini-breaths
SummaryMale canaries (Serinus canaria) produce songs of long duration compared to the normal respiratory cycle. Each phrase in a song contains repetitions of a particular song syllable, withExpand
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