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Epidural versus non-epidural or no analgesia in labour.
TLDR
Epidural analgesia appears to be effective in reducing pain during labour, however, women who use this form of pain relief are at increased risk of having an instrumental delivery and further research may be helpful to evaluate rare but potentially severe adverse effects of epidural analgesIA on women in labour and long-term neonatal outcomes.
The impact of outcome reporting bias in randomised controlled trials on a cohort of systematic reviews
TLDR
Outcome reporting bias is an under-recognised problem that affects the conclusions in a substantial proportion of Cochrane reviews and individuals conducting systematic reviews need to address explicitly the issue of missing outcome data for their review to be considered a reliable source of evidence.
Epidural versus non-epidural or no analgesia for pain management in labour.
TLDR
There was a substantial decrease in the need for additional pain relief in women receiving epidural analgesia compared with opioid analgesia, and a higher proportion were satisfied with their pain relief, reporting it to be "excellent or very good" (average risk ratio (RR) 1.47).
Amniotomy for shortening spontaneous labour.
TLDR
The evidence presented in this review cannot recommend that amniotomy should be introduced routinely as part of standard labour management and care, but it may be useful as a foundation for discussion and any resulting decisions made between women and their caregivers.
Breastfeeding expectations versus reality: a clusterrandomised controlled trial
TLDR
The aim is to evaluate the affect of an antenatal educational breastfeeding intervention on women's breastfeeding duration and to establish a baseline for this intervention.
Epidural versus non-epidural or no analgesia in labour.
TLDR
Epidural analgesia was found to offer better pain relief and the need for additional means of pain relief; maternal satisfaction; and the length of second stage of labour; and oxytocin augmentation.
Effect of partogram use on outcomes for women in spontaneous labour at term.
TLDR
The findings of this review cannot recommend routine use of the partogram as part of standard labour management and care, and it appears reasonable, until stronger evidence is available, that partogram use should be locally determined.
Effect of partogram use on outcomes for women in spontaneous labour at term.
TLDR
The findings of this review cannot recommend routine use of the partogram as part of standard labour management and care and it is recommended that the evidence presented should be used as a basis for discussion between clinicians and women.
Frequency and reasons for outcome reporting bias in clinical trials: interviews with trialists
TLDR
The prevalence of incomplete outcome reporting is high and affects trial design, conduct, analysis, and reporting and a general lack of consensus regarding the choice of outcomes in particular clinical settings was evident.
Telephone support for women during pregnancy and the first six weeks postpartum.
TLDR
There was no consistent evidence confirming that telephone support reduces maternal anxiety during pregnancy or after the birth of the baby, although results on anxiety outcomes were not easy to interpret as data were collected at different time points using a variety of measurement tools.
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