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The Limits to Peat Bog Growth
Not less than 2% of the Earth's land surface is peat-covered, so it is important to try to understand the dynamics of peat accumulation. Peat-forming systems (mires) accumulate peat because
Carbon accumulation in peatland
TLDR
Understanding of peatland dynamics may result from the use of intrinsic models allowing decay: it is unlikely to emerge from the exotic models in common use.
The Ecology of Sphagnum
TLDR
Sphagnum plants grow at the apex, as do most other mosses, and develop into branches of determinate growth, though in a few cases (S. cuspidatum var. plumosum for example), the branches may themselves branch.
THE GROWTH OF SPHAGNUM: METHODS OF MEASUREMENT
TLDR
Any attempt to account for the rates of peat formation, or for peat stratigraphy and present surface features, is likely to require information on the rate of Sphagnum growth.
Profiles of water content and pore size in Sphagnum and peat, and their relation to peat bog ecology
TLDR
The profiles of water content in almost undisturbed cores of two species are used to infer the size and distribution of spaces around the plants in an attempt to account for the observation that S. papillosum isUsually found not far above the water table, while S. capillifolium is usually found on hummocks well above theWater table.
Ion Exchange in Sphagnum and its Relation to Bog Ecology
TLDR
The kinetics of cation exchange are consistent with a heterogeneous exchange phase containing regions of high charge density and regions with lower charge density, and at equilibrium the proportions of different cations in the exchange phase are largely explicable by a Donnan distribution.
Feedback control of the rate of peat formation
TLDR
A feedback mechanism is presented that can explain how fine–scale and short–term variability in peat–forming processes is constrained to give steady rates of peat accumulation over longer time–scales.
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