• Publications
  • Influence
Volcanic carbon dioxide vents show ecosystem effects of ocean acidification
TLDR
The species populating the vent sites comprise a suite of organisms that are resilient to naturally high concentrations of pCO2 and indicate that ocean acidification may benefit highly invasive non-native algal species.
Coral and mollusc resistance to ocean acidification adversely affected by warming
Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations are expected to decrease surface ocean pH by 0.3‐0.5 units by 2100 (refs 1,2), lowering the carbonate ion concentration of surface waters.
Effects of naturally acidified seawater on seagrass calcareous epibionts
TLDR
The response of calcareous seagrass epibionts to elevated CO2 partial pressure in aquaria and at a volcanic vent area where seagRass habitat has been exposed to high CO2 levels for decades are shown.
Effects of ocean acidification on invertebrate settlement at volcanic CO2 vents
TLDR
It is shown that increased levels of CO2 can profoundly affect the settlement of a wide range of benthic organisms and small crustaceans was able to settle and survive under these conditions.
Ocean acidification impairs vermetid reef recruitment
TLDR
Unless CO2 emissions are reduced and conservation measures taken, reef-building gastropod Dendropoma petraeum are in danger of extinction within this century, with significant ecological and socioeconomic ramifications for coastal systems.
Effects of ocean acidification and high temperatures on the bryozoan Myriapora truncata at natural CO2 vents
TLDR
Although M. truncata was resilient to short-term exposure to high levels of ocean acidification at normal temperatures, the field transplants showed that its ability to calcify at higher temperatures was compromised, adding it to the growing list of species now potentially threatened by global warming.
Response of the temperate coral Cladocora caespitosa to mid- and long-term exposure to p CO 2 and temperature levels projected for the year 2100 AD
TLDR
It is shown, using the Mediterranean zooxanthellate coral Cladocora caespitosa, that an increase in pCO2, in the range predicted for 2100, does not reduce its calcification rate, and the conventional belief that calcification rates will be affected by ocean acidification may not be widespread in temperate corals.
Tissue necrosis and mortality of the temperate coral Cladocora Caespitosa
TLDR
To verify experimentally the hypothesis that mass‐mortality was primarily induced by a seawater temperature increase of up to 4 °C for several weeks, nubbins of the coral were maintained in aquaria at a temperature higher than the normal maximum summer value and showed a mortality pattern similar to that observed in the field, with the gradual necrosis of tissue to leave only the bare skeleton.
...
...