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Genome-wide patterns of selection in 230 ancient Eurasians
TLDR
A genome-wide scan for selection using ancient DNA is reported, capitalizing on the largest ancient DNA data set yet assembled: 230 West Eurasians who lived between 6500 and 300 bc, including 163 with newly reported data.
Tracing the Origin and Spread of Agriculture in Europe
TLDR
An interpolative map of correlation coefficients, obtained by using shortest-path distances, shows that the origins of agriculture were most likely to have occurred in the northern Levantine/Mesopotamian area.
The genetic history of Ice Age Europe
Modern humans arrived in Europe ~45,000 years ago, but little is known about their genetic composition before the start of farming ~8,500 years ago. We analyze genome-wide data from 51 Eurasians from
Genomic insights into the origin of farming in the ancient Near East
We report genome-wide ancient DNA from 44 ancient Near Easterners ranging in time between ~12,000 and 1,400 bc, from Natufian hunter–gatherers to Bronze Age farmers. We show that the earliest
Genome flux and stasis in a five millennium transect of European prehistory
TLDR
A 5,000-year transect of human genomes sampled from petrous bones giving consistently excellent endogenous DNA yields are analysed, suggesting genomic shifts with the advent of the Neolithic, Bronze and Iron Ages, with interleaved periods of genome stability.
The timing and spatiotemporal patterning of Neanderthal disappearance
TLDR
Improved accelerator mass spectrometry 14C techniques are applied to construct robust chronologies from 40 key Mousterian and Neanderthal archaeological sites, showing that there was ample time for the transmission of cultural and symbolic behaviours, as well as possible genetic exchanges, between the two groups.
Upper Palaeolithic genomes reveal deep roots of modern Eurasians
TLDR
It is found that Caucasus hunter-gatherers (CHG) belong to a distinct ancient clade that split from western hunter- Gatherers ∼45 kya, shortly after the expansion of anatomically modern humans into Europe and from the ancestors of Neolithic farmers ∼25 KYa, around the Last Glacial Maximum.
The Beaker Phenomenon and the Genomic Transformation of Northwest Europe
TLDR
Genome-wide data from 400 Neolithic, Copper Age and Bronze Age Europeans is presented, finding limited genetic affinity between Beaker-complex-associated individuals from Iberia and central Europe, and excludes migration as an important mechanism of spread between these two regions.
The Genomic History of Southeastern Europe
TLDR
It is shown that southeastern Europe continued to be a nexus between east and west after the arrival of farmers, with intermittent genetic contact with steppe populations occurring up to 2,000 years earlier than the migrations from the steppe that ultimately replaced much of the population of northern Europe.
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