• Publications
  • Influence
Interference to ongoing activities covaries with the characteristics of an event-based intention.
TLDR
This study demonstrated that there is a reciprocal relationship insofar as cue-verification and response-retrieval processes interfered with making a response in the ongoing task.
Event-based prospective memory and executive control of working memory.
  • R. Marsh, J. Hicks
  • Psychology, Biology
    Journal of experimental psychology. Learning…
  • 1998
TLDR
In 5 experiments, the character of concurrent cognitive processing was manipulated during an event-based prospective memory task, with results discussed in terms of executive functions, such as planning and monitoring, that appear to be critical to successful event- based prospective memory.
Activation of Completed , Uncompleted , and Partially Completed Intentions
The intention-superiority effect is the finding that response latencies are faster for items related to an uncompleted intention as compared with materials that have no associated intentionality. T.
A decrement-to-familiarity interpretation of the revelation effect from forced-choice tests of recognition memory.
  • J. Hicks, R. Marsh
  • Psychology
    Journal of experimental psychology. Learning…
  • 1 September 1998
TLDR
The authors argue that revelation decrements familiarity, and this results in a more liberal criterion shift, and they also argue that their theory is more consistent with previous empirical data.
On the relationship between effort toward an ongoing task and cue detection in event-based prospective memory.
TLDR
The authors manipulated effort toward an ongoing cognitive task in which intention-related cues were embedded in 3 experiments in order to simulate natural variations in attention.
An investigation of everyday prospective memory
TLDR
The goal was to demonstrate that the cognitive processing underlying successful everyday prospective remembering involves components other than mere “memory,” which may determine how people actually accomplish the plans they establish for themselves.
Eliciting cryptomnesia: unconscious plagiarism in a puzzle task.
  • R. Marsh, G. Bower
  • Psychology
    Journal of experimental psychology. Learning…
  • 1 May 1993
TLDR
In three experiments, cryptomnesia (unconscious plagiarism) and source memory are investigated using a word-search puzzle task and a unitary relative strength model is used to explain both source and occurrence (item) forgetting.
...
...