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Why Do We Gesture When We Speak?
This is a pre-editing version of a paper published as: Krauss, R.M. (1998). Why do we gesture when we speak? Current Directions in Psychological Science 7, 54-59. Students of human natureExpand
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Language and Gesture: Lexical gestures and lexical access: a process model
Introduction Observers of human behavior have long been fascinated by the gestures that accompany speech, and by the contributions to communication they purportedly make. Yet, despite thisExpand
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Gesture, Speech, and Lexical Access: The Role of Lexical Movements in Speech Production
In a within-subjects design that varied whether speakers were allowed to gesture and the difficulty of lexical access, speakers were videotaped as they described animated action cartoons to aExpand
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Coordination of knowledge in communication: effects of speakers' assumptions about what others know.
Two pairs of studies examined effects of perspective taking in communication, using a 2-stage methodology that first obtained people's estimates of the recognizability to others of specific stimuliExpand
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Phonetic convergence in college roommates
Abstract Previous studies have found that talkers converge or diverge in phonetic form during a single conversational session or as a result of long-term exposure to a particular linguisticExpand
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Nonverbal Behavior and Nonverbal Communication: What do Conversational Hand Gestures Tell Us?
Publisher Summary This chapter explores how gestures contribute to comprehension, how gesturing affect speech and what can be learned from studying conversational gestures. The primary function ofExpand
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Dominance and accommodation in the conversational behaviours of same- and mixed-gender dyads.
Among the first writers to posit a relationship between the language women use and their social condition was the linguist Robin Lakoff (1975; see also Key, 1973, who defined a ‘female register’ thatExpand
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Concurrent feedback, confirmation, and the encoding of referents in verbal communication.
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Inferring speakers’ physical attributes from their voices
Abstract Two experiments examined listeners’ ability to make accurate inferences about speakers from the nonlinguistic content of their speech. In Experiment I, naive listeners heard male and femaleExpand
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The Role of Speech-Related Arm/Hand Gestures in Word Retrieval
Note: This is a pre-editing version of a chapter that appeared in
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