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Specialization on traits as basis for the niche‐breadth of flower visitors and as structuring mechanism of ecological networks
TLDR
The data suggested a hierarchical sequence of flower traits influencing the flower visitors' behaviour and thus network structure: flowering phenology was found to have the strongest effect, followed by flower height, nectar-tube depth and floral reflectance.
Dynamic range boxes – a robust nonparametric approach to quantify size and overlap of n‐dimensional hypervolumes
n‐dimensional hypervolumes are commonly applied in ecology and evolutionary studies to describe and compare niches, trait spaces characterizing phenotypes or the functional composition of
TRY plant trait database – enhanced coverage and open access
TLDR
The extent of the trait data compiled in TRY is evaluated and emerging patterns of data coverage and representativeness are analyzed to conclude that reducing data gaps and biases in the TRY database remains a key challenge and requires a coordinated approach to data mobilization and trait measurements.
Floral scents repel potentially nectar-thieving ants
TLDR
This is the first clear demonstration that ant repellence from flowers is triggered by naturally emitted floral volatiles, and suggests that floral scents may function as allomones against enemies and not solely as synomones to attract mutualists.
The potential for indirect effects between co-flowering plants via shared pollinators depends on resource abundance, accessibility and relatedness.
TLDR
The potential for one plant species to influence another indirectly via shared pollinators was greater for plants whose resources were more abundant (higher floral unit number and nectar sugar content) and more accessible.
Working Towards a Holistic View on Flower Traits— How Floral Scents Mediate Plant-Animal Interactions in Concert with Other Floral Characters
TLDR
This review discusses the functions of scent bouquets, colouration, morphology and rewards in flower–visitor interactions from an ecological and evolutionary perspective in isolation and taken together, and demonstrates that floral scent bouquet effects on flower visitors are context-dependent.
CYP76C1 (Cytochrome P450)-Mediated Linalool Metabolism and the Formation of Volatile and Soluble Linalool Oxides in Arabidopsis Flowers: A Strategy for Defense against Floral Antagonists[OPEN]
TLDR
Evidence is provided that CYP76C1 is a multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes a cascade of oxidation reactions and is the major linalool metabolizing oxygenase in Arabidopsis flowers and contributes to reduced floral attraction and favor protection against visitors and pests.
Microhabitat heterogeneity across leaves and flower organs promotes bacterial diversity.
TLDR
This study determines that leaves and three floral microhabitats of Metrosideros polymorpha (Myrtaceae), a tree endemic to Hawai'i, host unique indicator communities composed of relatively abundant bacterial taxa.
Interaction between flowers, ants and pollinators: additional evidence for floral repellence against ants
TLDR
The results are consistent with the hypothesis that ants may negatively affect plant fitness by reduced intensity of pollinator visits and that ants are repelled from flowers of many tropical plant species, although this repellence is clearly not ubiquitous.
Floral scents repel facultative flower visitors, but attract obligate ones.
TLDR
Flower scent bouquets in conjunction with nutritious rewards may solve the conflicting tasks of attracting mutualists while repelling antagonists, suggesting that obligate flower visitors evolved a tolerance against primarily defensive compounds.
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