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Friendships between males and lactating females in a free-ranging group of olive baboons (Papio hamadryas anubis): evidence from playback experiments
Close association between an anoestrous female at the time of lactation and adult male(s) is relatively rare in mammals, but common in baboons (Papio hamadryas subsp.). The functional significance ofExpand
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Female social relationships in a captive group of Campbell's monkeys (Cercopithecus campbelli campbelli)
A study group of Campbell's monkeys (Cercopithecus c. campbelli) provided data on affiliative and agonistic relationships between females. Over a period of two years (involving 111 hr), we conductedExpand
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Influence of the presence of seeds and litter on the behaviour of captive red-capped mangabeys Cercocebus torquatus torquatus
The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of the presence of seeds and litter on the time budget of a family group of red-capped mangabeys, to improve animal welfare. Five experimentalExpand
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Grooming-at-a-distance by exchanging calls in non-human primates
The ‘social bonding hypothesis' predicts that, in large social groups, functions of gestural grooming should be partially transferred to vocal interactions. Hence, vocal exchanges would have evolvedExpand
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Copying hierarchical leaders’ voices? Acoustic plasticity in female Japanese macaques
It has been historically claimed that call production in nonhuman primates has been shaped by genetic factors, although, recently socially-guided plasticity and cortical control during vocalExpand
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Factors of influence and social correlates of parturition in captive Campbell's monkeys: Case study and breeding data
How nonhuman primates deal with birth, at the moment of delivery, and during the following days, remains poorly explored because of the unpredictability of this event, particularly forExpand
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Animal behaviour Grooming-ata-distance by exchanging calls in non-human primates
The ‘social bonding hypothesis’ predicts that, in large social groups, functions of gestural grooming should be partially transferred to vocal interactions. Hence, vocal exchanges would have evolvedExpand
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