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Direct and ecological costs of resistance to herbivory
TLDR
It is found that many more studies have documented costs of resistance (sensu lato) than found during the 1996 survey and that eighty-two percent of studies in which genetic background is controlled, demonstrate significant fitness reductions associated with herbivore resistance. Expand
Nectar Robbing: Ecological and Evolutionary Perspectives
TLDR
The evolutionary ecology of nectar robbing is reviewed from both the plant and animal perspective, and how plants may be able to deter robbers through morphological and chemical traits is detailed. Expand
Florivory: the intersection of pollination and herbivory.
TLDR
The approaches to studying florivory that are outlined may yield novel insights into floral and defence traits not illuminated by studies of pollination or herbivory alone. Expand
Ecological and Evolutionary Consequences of Multispecies Plant-Animal Interactions
TLDR
Here, the evidence for criteria identified to detect community-based, diffuse coevolution is reviewed and the evidence that multispecies interactions have demographic consequences for populations, as well as evolutionary consequences is reviewed. Expand
Optimal defence theory and flower petal colour predict variation in the secondary chemistry of wild radish
TLDR
Petal colour variants differed in their induced responses to damage, but not in their constitutive levels of compounds, and individual glucosinolates differed in both their degree of inducibility as well as in their distribution between tissue types. Expand
TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL VARIATION IN POLLINATION OF A MONTANE HERB: A SEVEN-YEAR STUDY
TLDR
Results of a long-term study of Ipomopsis aggregata, a semelparous montane herb whose flowers are visited by hummingbird and insect pollinators as well as “floral larcenists,” show variation in mean stigma pollen load among plants flowering in the same site and year is explained. Expand
Linking economic activities to the distribution of exotic plants.
TLDR
A hypothesis that links ecology and economics to provide a causal framework for the distribution of exotic plants in the United States shows that economics matter for resolving the exotic-species problem because the underlying causes, and some of the solutions, may lie in human-economic behaviors. Expand
Direct and indirect effects of pollinators and seed predators to selection on plant and floral traits
TLDR
The results suggest that the remarkable intraspecific variation in plant and floral characters exhibited by some flowering plants is likely the result of selection driven, at least in part, by pollinators in concert with antagonists, such as pre-dispersal seed predators. Expand
Nectar robbing in Ipomopsis aggregata : effects on pollinator behavior and plant fitness
TLDR
The results indicate that hummingbird avoidance of nectar-robbed plants and flowers reduces plant fitness components and suggests that the mutualisms between pollinators and host plants may be affected by other species, such as nectar robbers. Expand
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