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The G-protein-coupled receptors in the human genome form five main families. Phylogenetic analysis, paralogon groups, and fingerprints.
TLDR
This study represents the first overall map of the GPCR sequences in a single mammalian genome and shows several common structural features indicating that the human GPCRs in the GRAFS families share a common ancestor. Expand
The Repertoire of G-Protein–Coupled Receptors in Fully Sequenced Genomes
TLDR
The results show that the main families in the human genome, Glutamate, Rhodopsin, Adhesion, Frizzled, and Secretin, arose before the split of nematodes from the chordate lineage. Expand
In vivo evolution of HIV-1 co-receptor usage and sensitivity to chemokine-mediated suppression
TLDR
A consistent pattern of evolution of viral co-receptor usage and sensitivity to chemokine-mediated suppression in a longitudinal follow-up of children with progressive HIV-1 infection is document. Expand
Differences in chemokine coreceptor usage between genetic subtypes of HIV-1.
TLDR
This study shows that CXCR4 usage determines the biological phenotype for all subtypes, but that there appear to exist subtype-dependent differences in frequency of usage of certain coreceptors, opening up the possibility that genetic subtypes may differ in important biological properties such as virulence, tissue tropism, and transmissibility. Expand
The GRAFS classification system of G-protein coupled receptors in comparative perspective.
TLDR
An insight is provided in several studies that are being performed to elucidate the evolutionary history of the GPCR family as some of the branches are specific for certain lineages such as vertebrates or mammals, while others are found in a much larger variety of species. Expand
Comprehensive repertoire and phylogenetic analysis of the G protein-coupled receptors in human and mouse.
TLDR
This is the most comprehensive study of the gene repertoire that codes for human and mouse GPCRs with a phylogenetic road map and searches for expressed sequence tags (ESTs) identified more than 17,000 ESTs matching GPCRS in mouse and human, providing information about their expression patterns. Expand
Seven evolutionarily conserved human rhodopsin G protein‐coupled receptors lacking close relatives
TLDR
Seven new members of the superfamily of human G protein‐coupled receptors (GPCRs) found by searches in the human genome databases are reported, termed GPR100, GPR119,GPR120, G PR120, L1, L2, L3, L4, and GPR142, which show similarity with the orphan receptor SALPR. Expand
Exposure to subliminal arousing stimuli induces robust activation in the amygdala, hippocampus, anterior cingulate, insular cortex and primary visual cortex: A systematic meta-analysis of fMRI studies
TLDR
Four Activation Likelihood Estimation meta-analyses of fMRI studies using subliminal paradigms are reviewed and discussed, finding a maximum of 9 out of 12 studies usingSubliminal presentation of faces contributing to activation of the amygdala, and also a significantly high number of studies reporting activation in the bilateral anterior cingulate, bilateral insular cortex, hippocampus and primary visual cortex. Expand
The obesity gene, FTO, is of ancient origin, up-regulated during food deprivation and expressed in neurons of feeding-related nuclei of the brain.
TLDR
The FTO gene is predominantly expressed in neurons, whereas it was virtually not found in astrocytes or glia cells, consistent with the hypothesis that FTO could participate in the central control of energy homeostasis. Expand
The melanocortin system in Fugu: determination of POMC/AGRP/MCR gene repertoire and synteny, as well as pharmacology and anatomical distribution of the MCRs.
TLDR
The study shows that some parts of the MC system are highly conserved through vertebrate evolution, such as regions in POMC coding for ACTH, alpha- MSH, and beta-MSH, the C-terminal region of AGRP, key binding units within the MC1R, MC2R,MC4R, and MC5R, synteny blocks around the MCRs, and pharmacological properties of theMC2R. Expand
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