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PHOTOMORPHOGENESIS IN PLANTS
TLDR
The 28 chapters written by leading experts from Europe, Israel, Japan and the USA, provide an advanced treatise on the excitingand rapidly developing field of plant photomorphogenesis.
The physiology of phytochrome action.
  • R. E. Kendrick
  • Chemistry, Medicine
    Symposia of the Society for Experimental Biology
  • 1983
The aurea and yellow-green-2 Mutants of Tomato Are Deficient in Phytochrome Chromophore Synthesis*
TLDR
Together, these results identify both aurea and yellow-green-2 as mutants that are deficient in phytochrome chromophore synthesis.
Genetic dissection of blue-light sensing in tomato using mutants deficient in cryptochrome 1 and phytochromes A, B1 and B2.
TLDR
Results provide the first mutant-based characterization of cry1 in a plant species other than Arabidopsis, and suggest that an additional non-phytochrome photoreceptor may be active under short daily BL exposures.
Physiological interactions of phytochromes A, B1 and B2 in the control of development in tomato.
TLDR
The role of phy tochrome B2 in the control of photomorphogenesis in tomato has been investigated using recently isolated mutants carrying lesions in the PHYB2 gene, indicating that at least one of the two remaining phytochromes plays a significant role in tomato photomorphesis.
PHYSIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A HIGH‐PIGMENT MUTANT OF TOMATO
Abstract— A high‐pigment (hp) mutant, which shows exaggerated phytochrome responses and three other genotypes of Lycopersicon esculenrum Mill. cv. Ailsa Craig: the aurea (au) mutant deficient in the
Characterisation of the procera mutant of tomato and the interaction of gibberellins with end‐of‐day far‐red light treatments
TLDR
The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) slender mutant procera (pro) was analysed for its relationship with gibberellin (GA) by combining it with GA deficiency due to the gib-1 mutation and indicated that GAs are required for a response to this treatment, but that it act independently of the Pro gene product.
Photomorphogenic responses of long hypocotyl mutants of tomato
TLDR
Spectrophotometrically determined phytochrome is absent or strongly reduced in its seeds, dark-grown hypocotyls, light-grown leaves, and roots, suggesting that the phenotype of these mutants is correlated with a reduced phy tochrome content.
Tomato contains homologues of Arabidopsis cryptochromes 1 and 2
Cryptochromes are blue light photoreceptors found in both plants and animals. They probably evolved from photolyases, which are blue/UV-light-absorbing photoreceptors involved in DNA repair. In seed
The cucumber long hypocotyl mutant lacks a light-stable PHYB-like phytochrome.
TLDR
The results indicated that the lh mutant of cucumber lacks at least one type 2 phytochrome-like polypeptide, most probably a phyB gene product, and the correlation between the lack of this protein and the deficiency or absence of physiological responses to a light-stable phy tochrome species in this mutant helps to identify the physiological roles played by the products of different subfamilies within the phyTochrome gene family.
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