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  • Influence
TIME, TENSE AND ASPECT
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Data at the grammar-pragmatics interface: the case of resumptive pronouns in English
This paper explores the relation of grammaticality to acceptability through a discussion of the use of resumptive pronouns in spoken English. It is argued that undergeneration by some grammar ofExpand
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The dynamics of language : an introduction
The Point of Departure The Dynamics of Interpretation Relative Clause Construal Tree Growth and Language Typologies On the Right Periphery The Challenge of Japanese Swahili Agreement and ConjunctionExpand
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Formal Semantics: An Introduction
1. Introduction 2. Predicates and arguments 3. Negation and co-ordination 4. Type theory 5. Lambda abstraction 6. Quantification 7. Inference 8. Time, tense, and aspect 9. Possible worlds 10.Expand
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Grammars as Parsers: Meeting the Dialogue Challenge
TLDR
This paper takes an inherently incremental grammar formalism, Dynamic Syntax (DS) (Kempson et al., 2001), proposes a context-based extension and defines corresponding context-dependent parsing and generation models together with a resulting natural definition of context- dependent well-formedness. Expand
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Incrementality and intention-recognition in utterance processing
TLDR
We explore the extent to which the interactive coordination of dialogue exchange can be seen as emergent from low-level mechanisms of language processing, without needing representation by interlocutors of each other’s mental states, or fully developed intentions a s regards messages to be conveyed. Expand
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Splitting the “ I ” s and Crossing the “ You ” s : Context , Speech Acts and Grammar
The occurrence of split utterances (SUs) in dialogue raises many puzzles for grammar formalisms, from formal to pragmatic and even philosophical issues. This paper presents an account of some of theExpand
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Specifiers as secondary heads
TLDR
One of the important tasks of a syntactic theory is to provide an account of the different dependency relations that hold between elements in a phrase.1 In Dependency Grammar, there are two basic types: complement and adjunct (or modifier). The first defines an obligatory relation between a functor (or head) and its argument and the second an optional modification of a category. Expand
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